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Revisiting brain reserve hypothesis in frontotemporal dementia: evidence from a brain perfusion study.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Literature data on Alzheimer's disease suggest that years of schooling and occupational level are associated with a reserve mechanism. No data on patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are available yet.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the impact of education, occupation, and midlife leisure activities on brain reserve in bvFTD.

METHODS

Fifty-four bvFTD patients entered the study and underwent neuropsychological and behavioral assessment, including the FTD-modified Clinical Dementia Rating for FTD (FTD-modified CDR), and SPECT imaging. We tested for the linear correlation of educational and occupational level, and midlife leisure activities with regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), controlling for demographic variables (age and gender) and for cognitive performance (FTD-modified CDR) (statistical parametric mapping).

RESULTS

A significant relationship between higher educational and occupational attainments and lower rCBF in medial frontal cortex and dorsolateral frontal cortex, bilaterally, was found (p < 0.005). When midlife leisure activities were considered, no correlation was found. The correlation between a reserve index, accounting for both educational and occupational level, and rCBF showed the same pattern of hypoperfusion.

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that education and occupation act as proxies for reserve capacity in bvFTD. These lifestyle attainments may counteract the onset of this genetic-based disease in at-risk individuals.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Centre for Aging Brain and Dementia, Department of Neurology, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. bborroni@inwind.it

    , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aging
    Behavior
    Brain
    Brain Mapping
    Cerebrovascular Circulation
    Cysteine
    Dementia
    Education
    Female
    Humans
    Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
    Leisure Activities
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Neuropsychological Tests
    Occupations
    Organotechnetium Compounds
    Radionuclide Imaging
    Radiopharmaceuticals

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19690415

    Citation

    Borroni, B, et al. "Revisiting Brain Reserve Hypothesis in Frontotemporal Dementia: Evidence From a Brain Perfusion Study." Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, vol. 28, no. 2, 2009, pp. 130-5.
    Borroni B, Premi E, Agosti C, et al. Revisiting brain reserve hypothesis in frontotemporal dementia: evidence from a brain perfusion study. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2009;28(2):130-5.
    Borroni, B., Premi, E., Agosti, C., Alberici, A., Garibotto, V., Bellelli, G., ... Padovani, A. (2009). Revisiting brain reserve hypothesis in frontotemporal dementia: evidence from a brain perfusion study. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, 28(2), pp. 130-5. doi:10.1159/000235575.
    Borroni B, et al. Revisiting Brain Reserve Hypothesis in Frontotemporal Dementia: Evidence From a Brain Perfusion Study. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2009;28(2):130-5. PubMed PMID: 19690415.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Revisiting brain reserve hypothesis in frontotemporal dementia: evidence from a brain perfusion study. AU - Borroni,B, AU - Premi,E, AU - Agosti,C, AU - Alberici,A, AU - Garibotto,V, AU - Bellelli,G, AU - Paghera,B, AU - Lucchini,S, AU - Giubbini,R, AU - Perani,D, AU - Padovani,A, Y1 - 2009/08/18/ PY - 2009/06/27/accepted PY - 2009/8/20/entrez PY - 2009/8/20/pubmed PY - 2009/11/18/medline SP - 130 EP - 5 JF - Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders JO - Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord VL - 28 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Literature data on Alzheimer's disease suggest that years of schooling and occupational level are associated with a reserve mechanism. No data on patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are available yet. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of education, occupation, and midlife leisure activities on brain reserve in bvFTD. METHODS: Fifty-four bvFTD patients entered the study and underwent neuropsychological and behavioral assessment, including the FTD-modified Clinical Dementia Rating for FTD (FTD-modified CDR), and SPECT imaging. We tested for the linear correlation of educational and occupational level, and midlife leisure activities with regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), controlling for demographic variables (age and gender) and for cognitive performance (FTD-modified CDR) (statistical parametric mapping). RESULTS: A significant relationship between higher educational and occupational attainments and lower rCBF in medial frontal cortex and dorsolateral frontal cortex, bilaterally, was found (p < 0.005). When midlife leisure activities were considered, no correlation was found. The correlation between a reserve index, accounting for both educational and occupational level, and rCBF showed the same pattern of hypoperfusion. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that education and occupation act as proxies for reserve capacity in bvFTD. These lifestyle attainments may counteract the onset of this genetic-based disease in at-risk individuals. SN - 1421-9824 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19690415/Revisiting_brain_reserve_hypothesis_in_frontotemporal_dementia:_evidence_from_a_brain_perfusion_study_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000235575 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -