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Impact of school district sugar-sweetened beverage policies on student beverage exposure and consumption in middle schools.
J Adolesc Health. 2009 Sep; 45(3 Suppl):S30-7.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine the associations between 1) exposure to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in middle schools and student consumption of SSB during the school day; and 2) school district policies about SSB and exposure to SSB in schools.

METHODS

The strength of school district SSB policies was scored on three SSB policy indicators. Student SSB consumption at school was assessed by a self-administered Beverage and Snack Questionnaire. Exposure to SSB at school was defined as the number of vending slots and SSB venues as determined on-site at each school. Multivariate analysis considered the multilevel nature of the data.

RESULTS

Data from 9151 students in 64 middle schools in 28 districts were used in the analysis. With schools as the unit of analysis, the proportion of students who consumed any SSB at school ranged from 19.2% to 79.8%. SSB exposure was a significant predictor of SSB consumption (beta=.157, p < .001). SSB consumption was not significantly associated with the size of the school, the racial or ethnic composition of the school's students, or the proportion of students eligible for free and reduced price meals. District SSB policy scores ranged from 0 to 6 with a mean score of 3.25 (+/-2.15). District SSB policy was a significant predictor of SSB exposure (beta=-9.50, p < .0002).

CONCLUSIONS

School district SSB policies and exposure to SSB in middle schools are associated with student SSB consumption. Interventions to improve policies and their implementation may offer opportunities to improve the diets of adolescents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Public Health Nutrition, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-3410, USA. Djohn@u.washington.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19699434

Citation

Johnson, Donna B., et al. "Impact of School District Sugar-sweetened Beverage Policies On Student Beverage Exposure and Consumption in Middle Schools." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 45, no. 3 Suppl, 2009, pp. S30-7.
Johnson DB, Bruemmer B, Lund AE, et al. Impact of school district sugar-sweetened beverage policies on student beverage exposure and consumption in middle schools. J Adolesc Health. 2009;45(3 Suppl):S30-7.
Johnson, D. B., Bruemmer, B., Lund, A. E., Evens, C. C., & Mar, C. M. (2009). Impact of school district sugar-sweetened beverage policies on student beverage exposure and consumption in middle schools. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 45(3 Suppl), S30-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2009.03.008
Johnson DB, et al. Impact of School District Sugar-sweetened Beverage Policies On Student Beverage Exposure and Consumption in Middle Schools. J Adolesc Health. 2009;45(3 Suppl):S30-7. PubMed PMID: 19699434.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of school district sugar-sweetened beverage policies on student beverage exposure and consumption in middle schools. AU - Johnson,Donna B, AU - Bruemmer,Barbara, AU - Lund,Anne E, AU - Evens,Carina C, AU - Mar,Corinne M, Y1 - 2009/06/04/ PY - 2008/11/13/received PY - 2009/03/04/revised PY - 2009/03/18/accepted PY - 2009/8/25/entrez PY - 2009/9/3/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - S30 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 45 IS - 3 Suppl N2 - PURPOSE: To determine the associations between 1) exposure to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in middle schools and student consumption of SSB during the school day; and 2) school district policies about SSB and exposure to SSB in schools. METHODS: The strength of school district SSB policies was scored on three SSB policy indicators. Student SSB consumption at school was assessed by a self-administered Beverage and Snack Questionnaire. Exposure to SSB at school was defined as the number of vending slots and SSB venues as determined on-site at each school. Multivariate analysis considered the multilevel nature of the data. RESULTS: Data from 9151 students in 64 middle schools in 28 districts were used in the analysis. With schools as the unit of analysis, the proportion of students who consumed any SSB at school ranged from 19.2% to 79.8%. SSB exposure was a significant predictor of SSB consumption (beta=.157, p < .001). SSB consumption was not significantly associated with the size of the school, the racial or ethnic composition of the school's students, or the proportion of students eligible for free and reduced price meals. District SSB policy scores ranged from 0 to 6 with a mean score of 3.25 (+/-2.15). District SSB policy was a significant predictor of SSB exposure (beta=-9.50, p < .0002). CONCLUSIONS: School district SSB policies and exposure to SSB in middle schools are associated with student SSB consumption. Interventions to improve policies and their implementation may offer opportunities to improve the diets of adolescents. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19699434/Impact_of_school_district_sugar_sweetened_beverage_policies_on_student_beverage_exposure_and_consumption_in_middle_schools_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(09)00118-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -