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Changing to daylight saving time cuts into sleep and increases workplace injuries.
J Appl Psychol. 2009 Sep; 94(5):1305-17.JA

Abstract

The authors examine the differential influence of time changes associated with Daylight Saving Time on sleep quantity and associated workplace injuries. In Study 1, the authors used a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health database of mining injuries for the years 1983-2006, and they found that in comparison with other days, on Mondays directly following the switch to Daylight Saving Time-in which 1 hr is lost-workers sustain more workplace injuries and injuries of greater severity. In Study 2, the authors used a Bureau of Labor Statistics database of time use for the years 2003-2006, and they found indirect evidence for the mediating role of sleep in the Daylight Saving Time-injuries relationship, showing that on Mondays directly following the switch to Daylight Saving Time, workers sleep on average 40 min less than on other days. On Mondays directly following the switch to Standard Time-in which 1 hr is gained-there are no significant differences in sleep, injury quantity, or injury severity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Eli Broad Graduate School of Management, Michigan State University, N400 North Business Complex, East Lansing, MI 48824-1122, USA. christopher.montgomery.barnes@gmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19702372

Citation

Barnes, Christopher M., and David T. Wagner. "Changing to Daylight Saving Time Cuts Into Sleep and Increases Workplace Injuries." The Journal of Applied Psychology, vol. 94, no. 5, 2009, pp. 1305-17.
Barnes CM, Wagner DT. Changing to daylight saving time cuts into sleep and increases workplace injuries. J Appl Psychol. 2009;94(5):1305-17.
Barnes, C. M., & Wagner, D. T. (2009). Changing to daylight saving time cuts into sleep and increases workplace injuries. The Journal of Applied Psychology, 94(5), 1305-17. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0015320
Barnes CM, Wagner DT. Changing to Daylight Saving Time Cuts Into Sleep and Increases Workplace Injuries. J Appl Psychol. 2009;94(5):1305-17. PubMed PMID: 19702372.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changing to daylight saving time cuts into sleep and increases workplace injuries. AU - Barnes,Christopher M, AU - Wagner,David T, PY - 2009/8/26/entrez PY - 2009/8/26/pubmed PY - 2009/10/7/medline SP - 1305 EP - 17 JF - The Journal of applied psychology JO - J Appl Psychol VL - 94 IS - 5 N2 - The authors examine the differential influence of time changes associated with Daylight Saving Time on sleep quantity and associated workplace injuries. In Study 1, the authors used a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health database of mining injuries for the years 1983-2006, and they found that in comparison with other days, on Mondays directly following the switch to Daylight Saving Time-in which 1 hr is lost-workers sustain more workplace injuries and injuries of greater severity. In Study 2, the authors used a Bureau of Labor Statistics database of time use for the years 2003-2006, and they found indirect evidence for the mediating role of sleep in the Daylight Saving Time-injuries relationship, showing that on Mondays directly following the switch to Daylight Saving Time, workers sleep on average 40 min less than on other days. On Mondays directly following the switch to Standard Time-in which 1 hr is gained-there are no significant differences in sleep, injury quantity, or injury severity. SN - 0021-9010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19702372/Changing_to_daylight_saving_time_cuts_into_sleep_and_increases_workplace_injuries_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/apl/94/5/1305 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -