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GB virus C genotype 2 predominance in a hepatitis C virus/HIV infected population associated with reduced liver disease.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2009 Aug; 24(8):1407-10.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

GB virus C (GBV-C) infection in hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV co-infection is associated with a significant reduction in the severity of HCV-related liver disease. The role of GBV-C genotype in this association is unknown. It has been suggested that GBV-C genotype may influence CD4 positive T-cell counts in HCV/HIV co-infected patients. The aim of the present study was to identify the GBV-C genotype in a HCV/HIV co-infected population and determine if the GBV-C genotype contributes to a reduction in HCV-related liver disease.

METHODS

GBV-C RNA from 57 patients who were co-infected with HCV/HIV was analyzed. GBV-C RNA was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with primers to the NS5B gene and genotype determined by phylogenetic analysis after sequencing using E2 gene primers.

RESULTS

Genotype 2 was the predominant isolate in our population and was detected in 50/56 (89.3%) of patients, although sequences with similarity to genotypes 1, 3, 4 and 5 were also identified. There was no statistical difference between CD4 positive T-cell counts in the GBV-C genotype 2 and non-genotype 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

The GBV-C genotype distribution in our HCV/HIV patient group was consistent with that reported in other developed countries. The predominance of genotype 2 in this study meant that we could not draw a conclusion for the role of GBV-C genotype in the reduced severity of liver disease in co-infected patients but CD4 positive T-cell counts appeared to be unaffected by GBV-C genotype.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Alfred Hospital, Prahran, Victoria, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19702909

Citation

Berzsenyi, Mark D., et al. "GB Virus C Genotype 2 Predominance in a Hepatitis C virus/HIV Infected Population Associated With Reduced Liver Disease." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 24, no. 8, 2009, pp. 1407-10.
Berzsenyi MD, Bowden DS, Roberts SK, et al. GB virus C genotype 2 predominance in a hepatitis C virus/HIV infected population associated with reduced liver disease. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2009;24(8):1407-10.
Berzsenyi, M. D., Bowden, D. S., Roberts, S. K., & Revill, P. A. (2009). GB virus C genotype 2 predominance in a hepatitis C virus/HIV infected population associated with reduced liver disease. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 24(8), 1407-10. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2009.05920.x
Berzsenyi MD, et al. GB Virus C Genotype 2 Predominance in a Hepatitis C virus/HIV Infected Population Associated With Reduced Liver Disease. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2009;24(8):1407-10. PubMed PMID: 19702909.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - GB virus C genotype 2 predominance in a hepatitis C virus/HIV infected population associated with reduced liver disease. AU - Berzsenyi,Mark D, AU - Bowden,D Scott, AU - Roberts,Stuart K, AU - Revill,Peter A, PY - 2009/8/26/entrez PY - 2009/8/26/pubmed PY - 2009/11/3/medline SP - 1407 EP - 10 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 24 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: GB virus C (GBV-C) infection in hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV co-infection is associated with a significant reduction in the severity of HCV-related liver disease. The role of GBV-C genotype in this association is unknown. It has been suggested that GBV-C genotype may influence CD4 positive T-cell counts in HCV/HIV co-infected patients. The aim of the present study was to identify the GBV-C genotype in a HCV/HIV co-infected population and determine if the GBV-C genotype contributes to a reduction in HCV-related liver disease. METHODS: GBV-C RNA from 57 patients who were co-infected with HCV/HIV was analyzed. GBV-C RNA was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with primers to the NS5B gene and genotype determined by phylogenetic analysis after sequencing using E2 gene primers. RESULTS: Genotype 2 was the predominant isolate in our population and was detected in 50/56 (89.3%) of patients, although sequences with similarity to genotypes 1, 3, 4 and 5 were also identified. There was no statistical difference between CD4 positive T-cell counts in the GBV-C genotype 2 and non-genotype 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: The GBV-C genotype distribution in our HCV/HIV patient group was consistent with that reported in other developed countries. The predominance of genotype 2 in this study meant that we could not draw a conclusion for the role of GBV-C genotype in the reduced severity of liver disease in co-infected patients but CD4 positive T-cell counts appeared to be unaffected by GBV-C genotype. SN - 1440-1746 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19702909/GB_virus_C_genotype_2_predominance_in_a_hepatitis_C_virus/HIV_infected_population_associated_with_reduced_liver_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2009.05920.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -