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Pathways to adolescent overweight: Body mass index and height percentile change in childhood.
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2010; 5(1):80-7.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To study the magnitude and timing of changes in body mass index (BMI) and height percentiles in four groups of children defined by overweight status in early childhood and adolescence: nonoverweight-nonoverweight (N-N), nonoverweight-overweight (N-O), overweight-nonoverweight (O-N), and overweight-overweight (O-O). The aim was to determine if monitoring percentile changes can provide early warnings about risk for adolescent overweight before a chronic pattern of overweight is established.

METHODS

Data on 3 408 children from the US based National Longitudinal Survey of Youth's Child-Mother file were used. Each child was interviewed on average 5.7 times, with a total of 19,470 person/year observations. BMI and height percentiles were estimated as polynomial functions of age in months for each of the four groups using fixed coefficients and random coefficients models. The models were compared using the Aikake information criterion.

RESULTS

There was significant transition between initial and final weight states. Children who transitioned to overweight experienced larger increases in BMI percentile points at 2-6 years than at 7-10 years of age. N-O girls, but not boys, had significantly larger increases in height percentile than N-N girls, with the largest increases occurring by age 7. The height percentiles curves for N-O and O-O girls converged by age 8 years. O-N children experienced steeper declines in BMI percentile over longer periods of time than O-O children.

CONCLUSIONS

Monitoring changes in BMI and height percentiles can give early warnings about children at risk for adolescent overweight while there is ample time for intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Economics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA. reagan.3@osu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19707924

Citation

Reagan, Patricia B., and Pamela J. Salsberry. "Pathways to Adolescent Overweight: Body Mass Index and Height Percentile Change in Childhood." International Journal of Pediatric Obesity : IJPO : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 5, no. 1, 2010, pp. 80-7.
Reagan PB, Salsberry PJ. Pathways to adolescent overweight: Body mass index and height percentile change in childhood. Int J Pediatr Obes. 2010;5(1):80-7.
Reagan, P. B., & Salsberry, P. J. (2010). Pathways to adolescent overweight: Body mass index and height percentile change in childhood. International Journal of Pediatric Obesity : IJPO : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 5(1), 80-7. https://doi.org/10.3109/17477160903055929
Reagan PB, Salsberry PJ. Pathways to Adolescent Overweight: Body Mass Index and Height Percentile Change in Childhood. Int J Pediatr Obes. 2010;5(1):80-7. PubMed PMID: 19707924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pathways to adolescent overweight: Body mass index and height percentile change in childhood. AU - Reagan,Patricia B, AU - Salsberry,Pamela J, PY - 2009/8/27/entrez PY - 2009/8/27/pubmed PY - 2010/7/7/medline SP - 80 EP - 7 JF - International journal of pediatric obesity : IJPO : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Int J Pediatr Obes VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To study the magnitude and timing of changes in body mass index (BMI) and height percentiles in four groups of children defined by overweight status in early childhood and adolescence: nonoverweight-nonoverweight (N-N), nonoverweight-overweight (N-O), overweight-nonoverweight (O-N), and overweight-overweight (O-O). The aim was to determine if monitoring percentile changes can provide early warnings about risk for adolescent overweight before a chronic pattern of overweight is established. METHODS: Data on 3 408 children from the US based National Longitudinal Survey of Youth's Child-Mother file were used. Each child was interviewed on average 5.7 times, with a total of 19,470 person/year observations. BMI and height percentiles were estimated as polynomial functions of age in months for each of the four groups using fixed coefficients and random coefficients models. The models were compared using the Aikake information criterion. RESULTS: There was significant transition between initial and final weight states. Children who transitioned to overweight experienced larger increases in BMI percentile points at 2-6 years than at 7-10 years of age. N-O girls, but not boys, had significantly larger increases in height percentile than N-N girls, with the largest increases occurring by age 7. The height percentiles curves for N-O and O-O girls converged by age 8 years. O-N children experienced steeper declines in BMI percentile over longer periods of time than O-O children. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring changes in BMI and height percentiles can give early warnings about children at risk for adolescent overweight while there is ample time for intervention. SN - 1747-7174 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19707924/Pathways_to_adolescent_overweight:_Body_mass_index_and_height_percentile_change_in_childhood_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3109/17477160903055929 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -