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Molecular diversity of Frankia in root nodules of Alnus incana grown with inoculum from polluted urban soils.
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2004 Nov 01; 50(3):255-63.FM

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The establishment and growth of trees can be compromised by soil contamination which can reduce populations of key microbial symbionts. We describe the colonisation of grey alder (Alnus incana) by Frankia from 10 urban soils with varying degrees of organic and inorganic pollution. Principal components analysis (PCA) of soil chemical profiles showed a separation of remediated and unremediated soils. A. incana seedlings were used as trap plants to capture the microsymbiont from soil. After 6 months growth, nodulation was lowest on trees grown with the most contaminated soils. Plant biomass was positively correlated with root nodule biomass and negatively correlated with PAH concentration. DNA was isolated from nodules for the analysis of Frankia genetic diversity. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (IGS) of Frankia ribosomal DNA. PCR products were subject to restriction digestion yielding 10 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) types from 72 nodules analysed. Our results demonstrate that each soil supports a distinct nodulating Frankia community. Partial 16S sequencing placed most strains in Frankia clusters 1a and 1b, which are typically Alnus-infecting, but sequences from several nodules obtained from a gasworks soil belonged to cluster 3, normally associated with Elaeagnus. These results show for the first time that polluted soils can be an effective source of Alnus-infective Frankia. Inoculation with site-adapted Frankia under greenhouse conditions could thus be an appropriate strategy to increase the symbiotic capacity of A. incana and to improve its chances of survival and growth when planted on polluted soils.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, University of York, York, UK. kpr1@york.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19712365

Citation

Ridgway, K P., et al. "Molecular Diversity of Frankia in Root Nodules of Alnus Incana Grown With Inoculum From Polluted Urban Soils." FEMS Microbiology Ecology, vol. 50, no. 3, 2004, pp. 255-63.
Ridgway KP, Marland LA, Harrison AF, et al. Molecular diversity of Frankia in root nodules of Alnus incana grown with inoculum from polluted urban soils. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2004;50(3):255-63.
Ridgway, K. P., Marland, L. A., Harrison, A. F., Wright, J., Young, J. P., & Fitter, A. H. (2004). Molecular diversity of Frankia in root nodules of Alnus incana grown with inoculum from polluted urban soils. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 50(3), 255-63. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.femsec.2004.07.002
Ridgway KP, et al. Molecular Diversity of Frankia in Root Nodules of Alnus Incana Grown With Inoculum From Polluted Urban Soils. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2004 Nov 1;50(3):255-63. PubMed PMID: 19712365.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Molecular diversity of Frankia in root nodules of Alnus incana grown with inoculum from polluted urban soils. AU - Ridgway,K P, AU - Marland,L A, AU - Harrison,A F, AU - Wright,J, AU - Young,J P W, AU - Fitter,A H, PY - 2009/8/29/entrez PY - 2004/11/1/pubmed PY - 2009/9/15/medline SP - 255 EP - 63 JF - FEMS microbiology ecology JO - FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. VL - 50 IS - 3 N2 - ABSTRACT The establishment and growth of trees can be compromised by soil contamination which can reduce populations of key microbial symbionts. We describe the colonisation of grey alder (Alnus incana) by Frankia from 10 urban soils with varying degrees of organic and inorganic pollution. Principal components analysis (PCA) of soil chemical profiles showed a separation of remediated and unremediated soils. A. incana seedlings were used as trap plants to capture the microsymbiont from soil. After 6 months growth, nodulation was lowest on trees grown with the most contaminated soils. Plant biomass was positively correlated with root nodule biomass and negatively correlated with PAH concentration. DNA was isolated from nodules for the analysis of Frankia genetic diversity. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify the 16S-23S intergenic spacer (IGS) of Frankia ribosomal DNA. PCR products were subject to restriction digestion yielding 10 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) types from 72 nodules analysed. Our results demonstrate that each soil supports a distinct nodulating Frankia community. Partial 16S sequencing placed most strains in Frankia clusters 1a and 1b, which are typically Alnus-infecting, but sequences from several nodules obtained from a gasworks soil belonged to cluster 3, normally associated with Elaeagnus. These results show for the first time that polluted soils can be an effective source of Alnus-infective Frankia. Inoculation with site-adapted Frankia under greenhouse conditions could thus be an appropriate strategy to increase the symbiotic capacity of A. incana and to improve its chances of survival and growth when planted on polluted soils. SN - 1574-6941 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19712365/Molecular_diversity_of_Frankia_in_root_nodules_of_Alnus_incana_grown_with_inoculum_from_polluted_urban_soils_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/femsec/article-lookup/doi/10.1016/j.femsec.2004.07.002 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -