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Optimal cut-off levels to define obesity: body mass index and waist circumference, and their relationship to cardiovascular disease, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and diabetes in Malaysia.

Abstract

Many studies in Asia have demonstrated that Asian populations may require lower cut-off levels for body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference to define obesity and abdominal obesity respectively, compared to western populations. Optimal cut-off levels for body mass index and waist circumference were determined to assess the relationship between the two anthropometric- and cardiovascular indices. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off levels. The study sample included 1833 subjects (mean age of 44+/-14 years) from 93 primary care clinics in Malaysia. Eight hundred and seventy two of the subjects were men and 960 were women. The optimal body mass index cut-off values predicting dyslipidaemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or at least one cardiovascular risk factor varied from 23.5 to 25.5 kg/m2 in men and 24.9 to 27.4 kg/m2 in women. As for waist circumference, the optimal cut-off values varied from 83 to 92 cm in men and from 83 to 88 cm in women. The optimal cut-off values from our study showed that body mass index of 23.5 kg/m2 in men and 24.9 kg/m2 in women and waist circumference of 83 cm in men and women may be more suitable for defining the criteria for overweight or obesity among adults in Malaysia. Waist circumference may be a better indicator for the prediction of obesity-related cardiovascular risk factors in men and women compared to BMI. Further investigation using a bigger sample size in Asia needs to be done to confirm our findings.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medicine, International Medical University, and Clinical Research Centre, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, 50586, Jalan Pahang Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Body Mass Index
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diabetes Mellitus
    Female
    Humans
    Hyperlipidemias
    Hypertension
    Malaysia
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    ROC Curve
    Reference Values
    Risk Factors
    Waist Circumference

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19713180

    Citation

    Zaher, Zaki Morad Mohd, et al. "Optimal Cut-off Levels to Define Obesity: Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference, and Their Relationship to Cardiovascular Disease, Dyslipidaemia, Hypertension and Diabetes in Malaysia." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 18, no. 2, 2009, pp. 209-16.
    Zaher ZM, Zambari R, Pheng CS, et al. Optimal cut-off levels to define obesity: body mass index and waist circumference, and their relationship to cardiovascular disease, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and diabetes in Malaysia. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2009;18(2):209-16.
    Zaher, Z. M., Zambari, R., Pheng, C. S., Muruga, V., Ng, B., Appannah, G., & Onn, L. T. (2009). Optimal cut-off levels to define obesity: body mass index and waist circumference, and their relationship to cardiovascular disease, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and diabetes in Malaysia. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 18(2), pp. 209-16.
    Zaher ZM, et al. Optimal Cut-off Levels to Define Obesity: Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference, and Their Relationship to Cardiovascular Disease, Dyslipidaemia, Hypertension and Diabetes in Malaysia. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2009;18(2):209-16. PubMed PMID: 19713180.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Optimal cut-off levels to define obesity: body mass index and waist circumference, and their relationship to cardiovascular disease, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and diabetes in Malaysia. AU - Zaher,Zaki Morad Mohd, AU - Zambari,Robayaah, AU - Pheng,Chan Siew, AU - Muruga,Vadivale, AU - Ng,Bernard, AU - Appannah,Geeta, AU - Onn,Lim Teck, PY - 2009/8/29/entrez PY - 2009/8/29/pubmed PY - 2009/10/2/medline SP - 209 EP - 16 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 18 IS - 2 N2 - Many studies in Asia have demonstrated that Asian populations may require lower cut-off levels for body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference to define obesity and abdominal obesity respectively, compared to western populations. Optimal cut-off levels for body mass index and waist circumference were determined to assess the relationship between the two anthropometric- and cardiovascular indices. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off levels. The study sample included 1833 subjects (mean age of 44+/-14 years) from 93 primary care clinics in Malaysia. Eight hundred and seventy two of the subjects were men and 960 were women. The optimal body mass index cut-off values predicting dyslipidaemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or at least one cardiovascular risk factor varied from 23.5 to 25.5 kg/m2 in men and 24.9 to 27.4 kg/m2 in women. As for waist circumference, the optimal cut-off values varied from 83 to 92 cm in men and from 83 to 88 cm in women. The optimal cut-off values from our study showed that body mass index of 23.5 kg/m2 in men and 24.9 kg/m2 in women and waist circumference of 83 cm in men and women may be more suitable for defining the criteria for overweight or obesity among adults in Malaysia. Waist circumference may be a better indicator for the prediction of obesity-related cardiovascular risk factors in men and women compared to BMI. Further investigation using a bigger sample size in Asia needs to be done to confirm our findings. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19713180/Optimal_cut_off_levels_to_define_obesity:_body_mass_index_and_waist_circumference_and_their_relationship_to_cardiovascular_disease_dyslipidaemia_hypertension_and_diabetes_in_Malaysia_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/18/2/209.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -