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Good genes and good luck: ammonoid diversity and the end-Permian mass extinction.
Science. 2009 Aug 28; 325(5944):1118-21.Sci

Abstract

The end-Permian mass extinction removed more than 80% of marine genera. Ammonoid cephalopods were among the organisms most affected by this crisis. The analysis of a global diversity data set of ammonoid genera covering about 106 million years centered on the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) shows that Triassic ammonoids actually reached levels of diversity higher than in the Permian less than 2 million years after the PTB. The data favor a hierarchical rather than logistic model of diversification coupled with a niche incumbency hypothesis. This explosive and nondelayed diversification contrasts with the slow and delayed character of the Triassic biotic recovery as currently illustrated for other, mainly benthic groups such as bivalves and gastropods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

UMR-CNRS 5561 Biogéosciences, Université de Bourgogne, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, F-21000, Dijon, France. arnaud.brayard@u-bourgogne.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19713525

Citation

Brayard, Arnaud, et al. "Good Genes and Good Luck: Ammonoid Diversity and the end-Permian Mass Extinction." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 325, no. 5944, 2009, pp. 1118-21.
Brayard A, Escarguel G, Bucher H, et al. Good genes and good luck: ammonoid diversity and the end-Permian mass extinction. Science. 2009;325(5944):1118-21.
Brayard, A., Escarguel, G., Bucher, H., Monnet, C., Brühwiler, T., Goudemand, N., Galfetti, T., & Guex, J. (2009). Good genes and good luck: ammonoid diversity and the end-Permian mass extinction. Science (New York, N.Y.), 325(5944), 1118-21. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1174638
Brayard A, et al. Good Genes and Good Luck: Ammonoid Diversity and the end-Permian Mass Extinction. Science. 2009 Aug 28;325(5944):1118-21. PubMed PMID: 19713525.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Good genes and good luck: ammonoid diversity and the end-Permian mass extinction. AU - Brayard,Arnaud, AU - Escarguel,Gilles, AU - Bucher,Hugo, AU - Monnet,Claude, AU - Brühwiler,Thomas, AU - Goudemand,Nicolas, AU - Galfetti,Thomas, AU - Guex,Jean, PY - 2009/8/29/entrez PY - 2009/8/29/pubmed PY - 2009/9/10/medline SP - 1118 EP - 21 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 325 IS - 5944 N2 - The end-Permian mass extinction removed more than 80% of marine genera. Ammonoid cephalopods were among the organisms most affected by this crisis. The analysis of a global diversity data set of ammonoid genera covering about 106 million years centered on the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) shows that Triassic ammonoids actually reached levels of diversity higher than in the Permian less than 2 million years after the PTB. The data favor a hierarchical rather than logistic model of diversification coupled with a niche incumbency hypothesis. This explosive and nondelayed diversification contrasts with the slow and delayed character of the Triassic biotic recovery as currently illustrated for other, mainly benthic groups such as bivalves and gastropods. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19713525/Good_genes_and_good_luck:_ammonoid_diversity_and_the_end_Permian_mass_extinction_ L2 - https://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19713525 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -