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Rapid automatized naming, phonology and dyslexia in Polish children.
Med Sci Monit. 2009 Sep; 15(9):CR460-9.MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many studies have showed that children with reading difficulties have deficits in both rapid automatized naming (RAN) and phonological skills (PS). The double-deficit hypothesis suggests that phonological and naming-speed deficits are two separable causes of reading problems. The main goal of our study was to investigate naming speed in Polish fourth grade children with dyslexia.

MATERIAL/METHODS

33 dyslexic children (10 girls and 23 boys) and 30 good readers participated in the study. They were given the Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children (WISC-R) and a battery of diagnostic tests for dyslexia for fourth-grade children, consisting of tests for single word reading, nonsense word reading, reading with word canceling, text comprehension, spelling on dictation, rapid automatic naming, phoneme elision, and phonological skills, as well as the Zetotest (a phonological memory test).

RESULTS

The dyslexic children performed significantly more slowly than controls on the RAN tests, which suggests a generalized deficit in the speed of access to the mental lexicon. Significant correlations were found only between the RAN test and the text comprehension text. Among all the phonological measures applied in the study, slight but significant correlations were found only between phonological memory and speed naming. Dyslexic children with low speed naming abilities and high speed naming abilities showed no differences in phonological functions.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results confirm the double-deficit hypothesis of dyslexia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Psychology, Maria Skłodowska-Curie University, Lublin, Poland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19721397

Citation

Krasowicz-Kupis, Grazyna, et al. "Rapid Automatized Naming, Phonology and Dyslexia in Polish Children." Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, vol. 15, no. 9, 2009, pp. CR460-9.
Krasowicz-Kupis G, Borkowska AR, Pietras I. Rapid automatized naming, phonology and dyslexia in Polish children. Med Sci Monit. 2009;15(9):CR460-9.
Krasowicz-Kupis, G., Borkowska, A. R., & Pietras, I. (2009). Rapid automatized naming, phonology and dyslexia in Polish children. Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, 15(9), CR460-9.
Krasowicz-Kupis G, Borkowska AR, Pietras I. Rapid Automatized Naming, Phonology and Dyslexia in Polish Children. Med Sci Monit. 2009;15(9):CR460-9. PubMed PMID: 19721397.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rapid automatized naming, phonology and dyslexia in Polish children. AU - Krasowicz-Kupis,Grazyna, AU - Borkowska,Aneta R, AU - Pietras,Izabela, PY - 2009/9/2/entrez PY - 2009/9/2/pubmed PY - 2009/11/3/medline SP - CR460 EP - 9 JF - Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research JO - Med Sci Monit VL - 15 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Many studies have showed that children with reading difficulties have deficits in both rapid automatized naming (RAN) and phonological skills (PS). The double-deficit hypothesis suggests that phonological and naming-speed deficits are two separable causes of reading problems. The main goal of our study was to investigate naming speed in Polish fourth grade children with dyslexia. MATERIAL/METHODS: 33 dyslexic children (10 girls and 23 boys) and 30 good readers participated in the study. They were given the Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children (WISC-R) and a battery of diagnostic tests for dyslexia for fourth-grade children, consisting of tests for single word reading, nonsense word reading, reading with word canceling, text comprehension, spelling on dictation, rapid automatic naming, phoneme elision, and phonological skills, as well as the Zetotest (a phonological memory test). RESULTS: The dyslexic children performed significantly more slowly than controls on the RAN tests, which suggests a generalized deficit in the speed of access to the mental lexicon. Significant correlations were found only between the RAN test and the text comprehension text. Among all the phonological measures applied in the study, slight but significant correlations were found only between phonological memory and speed naming. Dyslexic children with low speed naming abilities and high speed naming abilities showed no differences in phonological functions. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm the double-deficit hypothesis of dyslexia. SN - 1643-3750 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19721397/Rapid_automatized_naming_phonology_and_dyslexia_in_Polish_children_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -