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Induction and decay of short-term heat acclimation.
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009 Dec; 107(6):659-70.EJ

Abstract

The purpose of this work was to investigate adaptation and decay from short-term (5-day) heat acclimation (STHA). Ten moderately trained males (mean +/- SD age 28 +/- 7 years; body mass 74.6 +/- 4.4 kg; VO2peak 4.26 +/- 0.37 l min(-1)) underwent heat acclimation (Acc) for 90-min on 5-days consecutively (T (a) = 39.5 degrees C, 60% RH), under controlled hyperthermia (rectal temperature 38.5 degrees C). Participants completed a heat stress test (HST) 1 week before acclimation (Acc), then on the 2nd and 8th day (1 week) following Acc (T (a) = 35 degrees C, 60% RH). Seven participants completed HSTs 2 and 3 weeks after Acc. HST consisted of 90-min cycling at 40% peak power output before an incremental performance test. Rectal temperature at rest (37.1 +/- 0.4 degrees C) was not lowered by Acc (95% CI -0.3 to 0.2 degrees C), after 90-min exercise (38.6 +/- 0.5 degrees C) it reduced 0.3 degrees C (-0.5 to -0.1 degrees C) and remained at this level 1 week later (-0.5 to -0.1 degrees C), but not two (0.1 degrees C -0.4 to 0.5 degrees C; n = 7) or 3 weeks. Similarly, heart rate after 90-min exercise (146 +/- 21 b min(-1)) was reduced (-13: -6 to -20 b min(-1)) and remained at this level after 1 week (-13: -6 to -20 b min(-1)) but not two (-9: 6 to -23 b min(-1); n = 7) or 3 weeks. Performance (746 s) increased 106 s: 59 to 152 s after Acc and remained higher after one (76 s: 31 to 122) but not two (15 s: -88 to 142 s; n = 7) or 3 weeks. Therefore, STHA (5-day) induced adaptations permitting increased heat loss and this persisted 1 week but not 2 weeks following Acc.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Physical Education, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. a.t.garrett@herts.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19727796

Citation

Garrett, Andrew T., et al. "Induction and Decay of Short-term Heat Acclimation." European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 107, no. 6, 2009, pp. 659-70.
Garrett AT, Goosens NG, Rehrer NJ, et al. Induction and decay of short-term heat acclimation. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009;107(6):659-70.
Garrett, A. T., Goosens, N. G., Rehrer, N. J., Rehrer, N. G., Patterson, M. J., & Cotter, J. D. (2009). Induction and decay of short-term heat acclimation. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 107(6), 659-70. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-009-1182-7
Garrett AT, et al. Induction and Decay of Short-term Heat Acclimation. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009;107(6):659-70. PubMed PMID: 19727796.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Induction and decay of short-term heat acclimation. AU - Garrett,Andrew T, AU - Goosens,Niels G, AU - Rehrer,Nancy J, AU - Rehrer,Nancy G, AU - Patterson,Mark J, AU - Cotter,James D, Y1 - 2009/09/01/ PY - 2009/08/18/accepted PY - 2009/9/4/entrez PY - 2009/9/4/pubmed PY - 2010/3/24/medline SP - 659 EP - 70 JF - European journal of applied physiology JO - Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. VL - 107 IS - 6 N2 - The purpose of this work was to investigate adaptation and decay from short-term (5-day) heat acclimation (STHA). Ten moderately trained males (mean +/- SD age 28 +/- 7 years; body mass 74.6 +/- 4.4 kg; VO2peak 4.26 +/- 0.37 l min(-1)) underwent heat acclimation (Acc) for 90-min on 5-days consecutively (T (a) = 39.5 degrees C, 60% RH), under controlled hyperthermia (rectal temperature 38.5 degrees C). Participants completed a heat stress test (HST) 1 week before acclimation (Acc), then on the 2nd and 8th day (1 week) following Acc (T (a) = 35 degrees C, 60% RH). Seven participants completed HSTs 2 and 3 weeks after Acc. HST consisted of 90-min cycling at 40% peak power output before an incremental performance test. Rectal temperature at rest (37.1 +/- 0.4 degrees C) was not lowered by Acc (95% CI -0.3 to 0.2 degrees C), after 90-min exercise (38.6 +/- 0.5 degrees C) it reduced 0.3 degrees C (-0.5 to -0.1 degrees C) and remained at this level 1 week later (-0.5 to -0.1 degrees C), but not two (0.1 degrees C -0.4 to 0.5 degrees C; n = 7) or 3 weeks. Similarly, heart rate after 90-min exercise (146 +/- 21 b min(-1)) was reduced (-13: -6 to -20 b min(-1)) and remained at this level after 1 week (-13: -6 to -20 b min(-1)) but not two (-9: 6 to -23 b min(-1); n = 7) or 3 weeks. Performance (746 s) increased 106 s: 59 to 152 s after Acc and remained higher after one (76 s: 31 to 122) but not two (15 s: -88 to 142 s; n = 7) or 3 weeks. Therefore, STHA (5-day) induced adaptations permitting increased heat loss and this persisted 1 week but not 2 weeks following Acc. SN - 1439-6327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19727796/Induction_and_decay_of_short_term_heat_acclimation_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-009-1182-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -