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Clinical, microbiological profile and treatment outcome of ocular infections caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans.
Cornea. 2009 Dec; 28(10):1100-3.C

Abstract

PURPOSE

To study the microbiological profile and outcome of ocular infections caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

METHODS

Medical and microbiology records of patients with A. xylosoxidans ocular infections managed between May 2007 and December 2007 were reviewed.

RESULTS

The authors identified 10 patients whose eyes were infected by A. xylosoxidans during the study period. Of 10 patients, 8 had microbial keratitis, of whom 6 developed an infection after penetrating keratoplasty. The remaining 2 patients had endophthalmitis. The Gram-stained smear did not reveal any organism in 6 of 10 cases. In the 4 remaining cases, Gram-negative bacilli were reported. Out of 10 isolates, 9 were sensitive to ceftazidime, 7 to amikacin, 5 to ciprofloxacin, and 3 to ofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and chloramphenicol. Only one isolate was sensitive to moxifloxacin. Of the 6 patients with graft infection, 2 patients were lost to follow-up, infection was resolved in 3 patients, and the infection remained active in 1 patient. The two patients with endophthalmitis responded to antibacterial therapy and showed improved visual acuity. Infection was resolved in 2 patients with keratitis.

CONCLUSION

Although A. xylosoxidans ocular infections are rare, one should retain a high index of clinical suspicion in patients who present with slowly progressive disease characterized by a localized infiltration and show Gram-negative bacilli on smear examination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jhaveri Microbiology Centre, Hyderabad Eye Research Foundation, India. ashokkumar@lvpei.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19730091

Citation

Reddy, Ashok Kumar, et al. "Clinical, Microbiological Profile and Treatment Outcome of Ocular Infections Caused By Achromobacter Xylosoxidans." Cornea, vol. 28, no. 10, 2009, pp. 1100-3.
Reddy AK, Garg P, Shah V, et al. Clinical, microbiological profile and treatment outcome of ocular infections caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Cornea. 2009;28(10):1100-3.
Reddy, A. K., Garg, P., Shah, V., & Gopinathan, U. (2009). Clinical, microbiological profile and treatment outcome of ocular infections caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Cornea, 28(10), 1100-3. https://doi.org/10.1097/ICO.0b013e3181a1658f
Reddy AK, et al. Clinical, Microbiological Profile and Treatment Outcome of Ocular Infections Caused By Achromobacter Xylosoxidans. Cornea. 2009;28(10):1100-3. PubMed PMID: 19730091.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical, microbiological profile and treatment outcome of ocular infections caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans. AU - Reddy,Ashok Kumar, AU - Garg,Prashant, AU - Shah,Vishal, AU - Gopinathan,Usha, PY - 2009/9/5/entrez PY - 2009/9/5/pubmed PY - 2010/2/24/medline SP - 1100 EP - 3 JF - Cornea JO - Cornea VL - 28 IS - 10 N2 - PURPOSE: To study the microbiological profile and outcome of ocular infections caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans. METHODS: Medical and microbiology records of patients with A. xylosoxidans ocular infections managed between May 2007 and December 2007 were reviewed. RESULTS: The authors identified 10 patients whose eyes were infected by A. xylosoxidans during the study period. Of 10 patients, 8 had microbial keratitis, of whom 6 developed an infection after penetrating keratoplasty. The remaining 2 patients had endophthalmitis. The Gram-stained smear did not reveal any organism in 6 of 10 cases. In the 4 remaining cases, Gram-negative bacilli were reported. Out of 10 isolates, 9 were sensitive to ceftazidime, 7 to amikacin, 5 to ciprofloxacin, and 3 to ofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and chloramphenicol. Only one isolate was sensitive to moxifloxacin. Of the 6 patients with graft infection, 2 patients were lost to follow-up, infection was resolved in 3 patients, and the infection remained active in 1 patient. The two patients with endophthalmitis responded to antibacterial therapy and showed improved visual acuity. Infection was resolved in 2 patients with keratitis. CONCLUSION: Although A. xylosoxidans ocular infections are rare, one should retain a high index of clinical suspicion in patients who present with slowly progressive disease characterized by a localized infiltration and show Gram-negative bacilli on smear examination. SN - 1536-4798 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19730091/Clinical_microbiological_profile_and_treatment_outcome_of_ocular_infections_caused_by_Achromobacter_xylosoxidans_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/ICO.0b013e3181a1658f DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -