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Associations between dietary patterns and obesity phenotypes.
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Dec; 33(12):1419-26.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine whether dietary patterns are associated with obesity phenotypes.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SUBJECTS

We recruited 664 participants aged between 18 and 55 years. Dietary data were collected from a food frequency questionnaire. A factor analysis was performed to derive dietary patterns. Body mass index (BMI), weight and waist girth were recorded using standard procedures. Fat mass and fat-free mass were assessed by electrical bioimpedance. Obesity was defined as having a BMI> or =30 kg m(-2) and a positive FHO (FHO+) as having at least one obese first-degree relative.

RESULTS

Two dietary patterns were identified; Western and Prudent. The Western pattern was mainly characterized by a higher consumption of refined grains, French fries, red meats, condiments, processed meats and regular soft drinks whereas the Prudent pattern was mainly characterized by a higher consumption of non-hydrogenated fat, vegetables, eggs and fish and seafood. Subjects in the top tertile of the Western pattern had higher BMI, weight, waist girth, waist-to-hip ratio and fat mass than those in the lower tertile. In contrast, subjects in the top tertile of the Prudent pattern had lower BMI, weight, waist girth, fat mass, HDL-cholesterol levels, and lower triglyceride levels than those in the lowest tertile. Individuals in the upper tertile of the Western pattern were more likely to be obese (obesity was defined as having a BMI> or =30 kg m(-2)) (OR=1.82, 95% CI 1.16-2.87) whereas those in the upper tertile of the Prudent pattern were less likely to be obese (OR=0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.96). These latter significant associations were only observed among those with FHO+. No such association was observed among FHO- individuals.

CONCLUSION

Individuals having a high score of Western pattern were more likely to be obese and those having a high score of the Prudent pattern were less likely to be obese, and this is particularly among individuals with an FHO+.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Laval University, Québec, Canada. marie-claude.vohl@crchul.ulaval.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19736556

Citation

Paradis, A-M, et al. "Associations Between Dietary Patterns and Obesity Phenotypes." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 33, no. 12, 2009, pp. 1419-26.
Paradis AM, Godin G, Pérusse L, et al. Associations between dietary patterns and obesity phenotypes. Int J Obes (Lond). 2009;33(12):1419-26.
Paradis, A. M., Godin, G., Pérusse, L., & Vohl, M. C. (2009). Associations between dietary patterns and obesity phenotypes. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 33(12), 1419-26. https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2009.179
Paradis AM, et al. Associations Between Dietary Patterns and Obesity Phenotypes. Int J Obes (Lond). 2009;33(12):1419-26. PubMed PMID: 19736556.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations between dietary patterns and obesity phenotypes. AU - Paradis,A-M, AU - Godin,G, AU - Pérusse,L, AU - Vohl,M-C, PY - 2009/9/9/entrez PY - 2009/9/9/pubmed PY - 2010/10/23/medline SP - 1419 EP - 26 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 33 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine whether dietary patterns are associated with obesity phenotypes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SUBJECTS: We recruited 664 participants aged between 18 and 55 years. Dietary data were collected from a food frequency questionnaire. A factor analysis was performed to derive dietary patterns. Body mass index (BMI), weight and waist girth were recorded using standard procedures. Fat mass and fat-free mass were assessed by electrical bioimpedance. Obesity was defined as having a BMI> or =30 kg m(-2) and a positive FHO (FHO+) as having at least one obese first-degree relative. RESULTS: Two dietary patterns were identified; Western and Prudent. The Western pattern was mainly characterized by a higher consumption of refined grains, French fries, red meats, condiments, processed meats and regular soft drinks whereas the Prudent pattern was mainly characterized by a higher consumption of non-hydrogenated fat, vegetables, eggs and fish and seafood. Subjects in the top tertile of the Western pattern had higher BMI, weight, waist girth, waist-to-hip ratio and fat mass than those in the lower tertile. In contrast, subjects in the top tertile of the Prudent pattern had lower BMI, weight, waist girth, fat mass, HDL-cholesterol levels, and lower triglyceride levels than those in the lowest tertile. Individuals in the upper tertile of the Western pattern were more likely to be obese (obesity was defined as having a BMI> or =30 kg m(-2)) (OR=1.82, 95% CI 1.16-2.87) whereas those in the upper tertile of the Prudent pattern were less likely to be obese (OR=0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.96). These latter significant associations were only observed among those with FHO+. No such association was observed among FHO- individuals. CONCLUSION: Individuals having a high score of Western pattern were more likely to be obese and those having a high score of the Prudent pattern were less likely to be obese, and this is particularly among individuals with an FHO+. SN - 1476-5497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19736556/Associations_between_dietary_patterns_and_obesity_phenotypes_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2009.179 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -