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Assessment of public health implication of malaria-geohelminth co-infection with an emphasis on hookworm-malaria anemia among suspected malaria patients in asendabo, southwest Ethiopia.
Ethiop Med J. 2009 Jan; 47(2):153-8.EM

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Malaria and geo-helminth infections are causes of severe illness and poor economic growth. Overlapping distributions of both parasites lead to high rate of co-infection.

OBJECTIVE

The study was designed to assess public health importance of Malaria-geo-helminth co-infection with an emphasis on anemia in Asendabo, south west Ethiopia.

METHODS

A total of 370 suspected malaria cases were involved in the study. Each stool sample was analyzed using Kato-Katz techniques. Thick blood films were used for detection and quantization of malaria parasites. Hemoglobin was determined using Sysmex hematology analyzer.

RESULT

61.6% individuals were positive for at least one intestinal helminth and/or protozoan infection. Hookworm was the most prevalent (38%) followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (19.2%) and Trichuris trichiura (10.3%). Furthermore, 32.4% of the study participants were positive for either of the two Plasmodium species; of which 64.3% were P. falciparum and the rest 35.7% were P. vivax. Based on WHO definition of anemia, 27.6% were anemic cases and both hookworm and malaria infections were significantly associated with anemia (P < 0.05). 20.8% of study participants were co-infected with malaria and any helminth. Hookworm and malaria positive individuals had low mean hemoglobin concentration than their respective negative counter parts and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). Furthermore, mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly lowered in malaria-hookworm co-infected individuals than individuals infected with either hookworm or malaria infection alone (F = 69.39, P = 0.000).

CONCLUSION

In general malaria hookworm co-infections worsen hemoglobin loss. And we recommend that individuals co-infected should receive prompt health care to control and prevent morbidity/mortality from anemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jimma Univerity PO Box 379 Jimma Ethiopia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19743795

Citation

Demissie, Fekadu, et al. "Assessment of Public Health Implication of Malaria-geohelminth Co-infection With an Emphasis On Hookworm-malaria Anemia Among Suspected Malaria Patients in Asendabo, Southwest Ethiopia." Ethiopian Medical Journal, vol. 47, no. 2, 2009, pp. 153-8.
Demissie F, Kebede A, Shimels T, et al. Assessment of public health implication of malaria-geohelminth co-infection with an emphasis on hookworm-malaria anemia among suspected malaria patients in asendabo, southwest Ethiopia. Ethiop Med J. 2009;47(2):153-8.
Demissie, F., Kebede, A., Shimels, T., & Beyene, P. (2009). Assessment of public health implication of malaria-geohelminth co-infection with an emphasis on hookworm-malaria anemia among suspected malaria patients in asendabo, southwest Ethiopia. Ethiopian Medical Journal, 47(2), 153-8.
Demissie F, et al. Assessment of Public Health Implication of Malaria-geohelminth Co-infection With an Emphasis On Hookworm-malaria Anemia Among Suspected Malaria Patients in Asendabo, Southwest Ethiopia. Ethiop Med J. 2009;47(2):153-8. PubMed PMID: 19743795.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Assessment of public health implication of malaria-geohelminth co-infection with an emphasis on hookworm-malaria anemia among suspected malaria patients in asendabo, southwest Ethiopia. AU - Demissie,Fekadu, AU - Kebede,Amha, AU - Shimels,Techalew, AU - Beyene,Petros, PY - 2009/9/12/entrez PY - 2009/9/12/pubmed PY - 2010/10/1/medline SP - 153 EP - 8 JF - Ethiopian medical journal JO - Ethiop Med J VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Malaria and geo-helminth infections are causes of severe illness and poor economic growth. Overlapping distributions of both parasites lead to high rate of co-infection. OBJECTIVE: The study was designed to assess public health importance of Malaria-geo-helminth co-infection with an emphasis on anemia in Asendabo, south west Ethiopia. METHODS: A total of 370 suspected malaria cases were involved in the study. Each stool sample was analyzed using Kato-Katz techniques. Thick blood films were used for detection and quantization of malaria parasites. Hemoglobin was determined using Sysmex hematology analyzer. RESULT: 61.6% individuals were positive for at least one intestinal helminth and/or protozoan infection. Hookworm was the most prevalent (38%) followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (19.2%) and Trichuris trichiura (10.3%). Furthermore, 32.4% of the study participants were positive for either of the two Plasmodium species; of which 64.3% were P. falciparum and the rest 35.7% were P. vivax. Based on WHO definition of anemia, 27.6% were anemic cases and both hookworm and malaria infections were significantly associated with anemia (P < 0.05). 20.8% of study participants were co-infected with malaria and any helminth. Hookworm and malaria positive individuals had low mean hemoglobin concentration than their respective negative counter parts and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). Furthermore, mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly lowered in malaria-hookworm co-infected individuals than individuals infected with either hookworm or malaria infection alone (F = 69.39, P = 0.000). CONCLUSION: In general malaria hookworm co-infections worsen hemoglobin loss. And we recommend that individuals co-infected should receive prompt health care to control and prevent morbidity/mortality from anemia. SN - 0014-1755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19743795/Assessment_of_public_health_implication_of_malaria_geohelminth_co_infection_with_an_emphasis_on_hookworm_malaria_anemia_among_suspected_malaria_patients_in_asendabo_southwest_Ethiopia_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/4415 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -