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Polycarbonate bottle use and urinary bisphenol A concentrations.
Environ Health Perspect. 2009 Sep; 117(9):1368-72.EH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production-volume chemical commonly used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic. Low-level concentrations of BPA in animals and possibly in humans may cause endocrine disruption. Whether ingestion of food or beverages from polycarbonate containers increases BPA concentrations in humans has not been studied.

OBJECTIVES

We examined the association between use of polycarbonate beverage containers and urinary BPA concentrations in humans.

METHODS

We conducted a nonrandomized intervention of 77 Harvard College students to compare urinary BPA concentrations collected after a washout phase of 1 week to those taken after an intervention week during which most cold beverages were consumed from polycarbonate drinking bottles. Paired t-tests were used to assess the difference in urinary BPA concentrations before and after polycarbonate bottle use.

RESULTS

The geometric mean urinary BPA concentration at the end of the washout phase was 1.2 microg/g creatinine, increasing to 2.0 microg/g creatinine after 1 week of polycarbonate bottle use. Urinary BPA concentrations increased by 69% after use of polycarbonate bottles (p < 0.0001). The association was stronger among participants who reported > or = 90% compliance (77% increase; p < 0.0001) than among those reporting < 90% compliance (55% increase; p = 0.03), but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.54).

CONCLUSIONS

One week of polycarbonate bottle use increased urinary BPA concentrations by two-thirds. Regular consumption of cold beverages from polycarbonate bottles is associated with a substantial increase in urinary BPA concentrations irrespective of exposure to BPA from other sources.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19750099

Citation

Carwile, Jenny L., et al. "Polycarbonate Bottle Use and Urinary Bisphenol a Concentrations." Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 117, no. 9, 2009, pp. 1368-72.
Carwile JL, Luu HT, Bassett LS, et al. Polycarbonate bottle use and urinary bisphenol A concentrations. Environ Health Perspect. 2009;117(9):1368-72.
Carwile, J. L., Luu, H. T., Bassett, L. S., Driscoll, D. A., Yuan, C., Chang, J. Y., Ye, X., Calafat, A. M., & Michels, K. B. (2009). Polycarbonate bottle use and urinary bisphenol A concentrations. Environmental Health Perspectives, 117(9), 1368-72. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.0900604
Carwile JL, et al. Polycarbonate Bottle Use and Urinary Bisphenol a Concentrations. Environ Health Perspect. 2009;117(9):1368-72. PubMed PMID: 19750099.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Polycarbonate bottle use and urinary bisphenol A concentrations. AU - Carwile,Jenny L, AU - Luu,Henry T, AU - Bassett,Laura S, AU - Driscoll,Daniel A, AU - Yuan,Caterina, AU - Chang,Jennifer Y, AU - Ye,Xiaoyun, AU - Calafat,Antonia M, AU - Michels,Karin B, Y1 - 2009/05/12/ PY - 2009/01/22/received PY - 2009/05/12/accepted PY - 2009/9/15/entrez PY - 2009/9/15/pubmed PY - 2009/11/17/medline KW - biomarkers KW - bisphenol A KW - endocrine disruptors KW - human KW - polycarbonate plastic SP - 1368 EP - 72 JF - Environmental health perspectives JO - Environ. Health Perspect. VL - 117 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production-volume chemical commonly used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic. Low-level concentrations of BPA in animals and possibly in humans may cause endocrine disruption. Whether ingestion of food or beverages from polycarbonate containers increases BPA concentrations in humans has not been studied. OBJECTIVES: We examined the association between use of polycarbonate beverage containers and urinary BPA concentrations in humans. METHODS: We conducted a nonrandomized intervention of 77 Harvard College students to compare urinary BPA concentrations collected after a washout phase of 1 week to those taken after an intervention week during which most cold beverages were consumed from polycarbonate drinking bottles. Paired t-tests were used to assess the difference in urinary BPA concentrations before and after polycarbonate bottle use. RESULTS: The geometric mean urinary BPA concentration at the end of the washout phase was 1.2 microg/g creatinine, increasing to 2.0 microg/g creatinine after 1 week of polycarbonate bottle use. Urinary BPA concentrations increased by 69% after use of polycarbonate bottles (p < 0.0001). The association was stronger among participants who reported > or = 90% compliance (77% increase; p < 0.0001) than among those reporting < 90% compliance (55% increase; p = 0.03), but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.54). CONCLUSIONS: One week of polycarbonate bottle use increased urinary BPA concentrations by two-thirds. Regular consumption of cold beverages from polycarbonate bottles is associated with a substantial increase in urinary BPA concentrations irrespective of exposure to BPA from other sources. SN - 1552-9924 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19750099/Polycarbonate_bottle_use_and_urinary_bisphenol_A_concentrations_ L2 - https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/doi/full/10.1289/ehp.0900604?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -