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Nipple pain at presentation predicts success of tongue-tie division for breastfeeding problems.
Eur J Pediatr Surg 2009; 19(6):370-3EJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

In mother-infant pairs experiencing breastfeeding difficulties, frenulotomy for tongue-tie may improve breastfeeding. We tested the hypothesis that those experiencing nipple pain are most likely to benefit from the procedure in a prospective cohort study.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Mother-infant pairs attending a dedicated clinic for the assessment and treatment of tongue-tie completed a standardised, structured symptom questionnaire. Three months later outcome was assessed by questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine preoperative predictors of successful outcome.

RESULTS

Sixty-two infants <90 days old underwent frenulotomy and completed follow-up. At presentation, 52 mothers (84%) reported nipple pain, and 32 mothers (52%) nipple trauma. Three months after frenulotomy, 78% of respondents were still breastfeeding. Feed lengths (mean reduction: 17 mins; p<0.001) and time between feeds (mean increase: 38 mins; p<0.001) had significantly improved, as had difficulty of feeding (mean improvement in self-rated difficulty score: 42%; p<0.001). Those having difficulty breastfeeding due to nipple pain showed a significant long-term benefit from frenulotomy; pre-frenulotomy nipple pain was associated with an increased likelihood of breastfeeding at 3 months in adjusted multivariate analysis (OR 5.8 [95% CI 1.1-31.6]).

CONCLUSION

Mother-infant pairs with tongue-tie and breastfeeding difficulties due to nipple pain are most likely to benefit from frenulotomy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatric Surgery, King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19750457

Citation

Khoo, A K K., et al. "Nipple Pain at Presentation Predicts Success of Tongue-tie Division for Breastfeeding Problems." European Journal of Pediatric Surgery : Official Journal of Austrian Association of Pediatric Surgery ... [et Al] = Zeitschrift Fur Kinderchirurgie, vol. 19, no. 6, 2009, pp. 370-3.
Khoo AK, Dabbas N, Sudhakaran N, et al. Nipple pain at presentation predicts success of tongue-tie division for breastfeeding problems. Eur J Pediatr Surg. 2009;19(6):370-3.
Khoo, A. K., Dabbas, N., Sudhakaran, N., Ade-Ajayi, N., & Patel, S. (2009). Nipple pain at presentation predicts success of tongue-tie division for breastfeeding problems. European Journal of Pediatric Surgery : Official Journal of Austrian Association of Pediatric Surgery ... [et Al] = Zeitschrift Fur Kinderchirurgie, 19(6), pp. 370-3. doi:10.1055/s-0029-1234041.
Khoo AK, et al. Nipple Pain at Presentation Predicts Success of Tongue-tie Division for Breastfeeding Problems. Eur J Pediatr Surg. 2009;19(6):370-3. PubMed PMID: 19750457.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nipple pain at presentation predicts success of tongue-tie division for breastfeeding problems. AU - Khoo,A K K, AU - Dabbas,N, AU - Sudhakaran,N, AU - Ade-Ajayi,N, AU - Patel,S, PY - 2009/9/15/entrez PY - 2009/9/15/pubmed PY - 2010/3/17/medline SP - 370 EP - 3 JF - European journal of pediatric surgery : official journal of Austrian Association of Pediatric Surgery ... [et al] = Zeitschrift fur Kinderchirurgie JO - Eur J Pediatr Surg VL - 19 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: In mother-infant pairs experiencing breastfeeding difficulties, frenulotomy for tongue-tie may improve breastfeeding. We tested the hypothesis that those experiencing nipple pain are most likely to benefit from the procedure in a prospective cohort study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mother-infant pairs attending a dedicated clinic for the assessment and treatment of tongue-tie completed a standardised, structured symptom questionnaire. Three months later outcome was assessed by questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine preoperative predictors of successful outcome. RESULTS: Sixty-two infants <90 days old underwent frenulotomy and completed follow-up. At presentation, 52 mothers (84%) reported nipple pain, and 32 mothers (52%) nipple trauma. Three months after frenulotomy, 78% of respondents were still breastfeeding. Feed lengths (mean reduction: 17 mins; p<0.001) and time between feeds (mean increase: 38 mins; p<0.001) had significantly improved, as had difficulty of feeding (mean improvement in self-rated difficulty score: 42%; p<0.001). Those having difficulty breastfeeding due to nipple pain showed a significant long-term benefit from frenulotomy; pre-frenulotomy nipple pain was associated with an increased likelihood of breastfeeding at 3 months in adjusted multivariate analysis (OR 5.8 [95% CI 1.1-31.6]). CONCLUSION: Mother-infant pairs with tongue-tie and breastfeeding difficulties due to nipple pain are most likely to benefit from frenulotomy. SN - 1439-359X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19750457/Nipple_pain_at_presentation_predicts_success_of_tongue_tie_division_for_breastfeeding_problems_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0029-1234041 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -