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Clinical implication of metabolic syndrome on chronic kidney disease depends on gender and menopausal status: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 Feb; 25(2):469-77.ND

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been increasing throughout the world over the last decade. Metabolic syndrome (MS) has been known to be an independent risk factor of CKD. However, both renal and metabolic diseases are experienced differently in men and women, and clinical implication of MS on CKD may be different according to gender.

METHODS

To understand the association between MS and CKD, we performed a cross-sectional study in non-institutionalized civilians using the data of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Of 37 769 participants, 5091 were available for the analysis of the prevalence of CKD (defined as dipstick proteinuria or a reduced GFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)).

RESULTS

The prevalence of CKD was 8.9% (7.4% in men, 4.7% in premenopausal women and 20.1% in postmenopausal women) and MS was seen in 26.2% (24.9% in men, 13.9% in premenopausal women and 52% in postmenopausal women). The prevalence of CKD increased with ageing, in particular after sharply after the age of 50 in both genders. MS was a significant determinant of CKD; however, sub-analysis revealed that MS was a risk factor for CKD only in men under the age of 60 and in postmenopausal women. Neither MS per se nor individual components of MS were associated with CKD in men over the age of 60 and in premenopausal women.

CONCLUSION

Differential effect of MS on CKD according to age and gender in our study may provide a clue to define the subject in need for more attention for the treatment of MS in terms of the development of CKD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19762608

Citation

Yu, Mina, et al. "Clinical Implication of Metabolic Syndrome On Chronic Kidney Disease Depends On Gender and Menopausal Status: Results From the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association, vol. 25, no. 2, 2010, pp. 469-77.
Yu M, Ryu DR, Kim SJ, et al. Clinical implication of metabolic syndrome on chronic kidney disease depends on gender and menopausal status: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010;25(2):469-77.
Yu, M., Ryu, D. R., Kim, S. J., Choi, K. B., & Kang, D. H. (2010). Clinical implication of metabolic syndrome on chronic kidney disease depends on gender and menopausal status: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association, 25(2), 469-77. https://doi.org/10.1093/ndt/gfp483
Yu M, et al. Clinical Implication of Metabolic Syndrome On Chronic Kidney Disease Depends On Gender and Menopausal Status: Results From the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010;25(2):469-77. PubMed PMID: 19762608.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical implication of metabolic syndrome on chronic kidney disease depends on gender and menopausal status: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. AU - Yu,Mina, AU - Ryu,Dong-Ryeol, AU - Kim,Seung-Jung, AU - Choi,Kyu-Bok, AU - Kang,Duk-Hee, Y1 - 2009/09/17/ PY - 2009/9/19/entrez PY - 2009/9/19/pubmed PY - 2010/5/21/medline SP - 469 EP - 77 JF - Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association JO - Nephrol Dial Transplant VL - 25 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been increasing throughout the world over the last decade. Metabolic syndrome (MS) has been known to be an independent risk factor of CKD. However, both renal and metabolic diseases are experienced differently in men and women, and clinical implication of MS on CKD may be different according to gender. METHODS: To understand the association between MS and CKD, we performed a cross-sectional study in non-institutionalized civilians using the data of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Of 37 769 participants, 5091 were available for the analysis of the prevalence of CKD (defined as dipstick proteinuria or a reduced GFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). RESULTS: The prevalence of CKD was 8.9% (7.4% in men, 4.7% in premenopausal women and 20.1% in postmenopausal women) and MS was seen in 26.2% (24.9% in men, 13.9% in premenopausal women and 52% in postmenopausal women). The prevalence of CKD increased with ageing, in particular after sharply after the age of 50 in both genders. MS was a significant determinant of CKD; however, sub-analysis revealed that MS was a risk factor for CKD only in men under the age of 60 and in postmenopausal women. Neither MS per se nor individual components of MS were associated with CKD in men over the age of 60 and in premenopausal women. CONCLUSION: Differential effect of MS on CKD according to age and gender in our study may provide a clue to define the subject in need for more attention for the treatment of MS in terms of the development of CKD. SN - 1460-2385 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19762608/Clinical_implication_of_metabolic_syndrome_on_chronic_kidney_disease_depends_on_gender_and_menopausal_status:_results_from_the_Korean_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ndt/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ndt/gfp483 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -