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Intestinal parasitic infections in relation to HIV/AIDS status, diarrhea and CD4 T-cell count.
BMC Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 18; 9:155.BI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

HIV infection has been modifying both the epidemiology and outcome of parasitic infections. Hence, this study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among people with and without HIV infection and its association with diarrhea and CD4 T-cell count.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study was conducted at Hawassa Teaching and Referral Hospital focusing on HIV positive individuals, who gave blood for CD4 T-cell count at their first enrollment and clients tested HIV negative from November, 2008 to March, 2009. Data on socio-demographic factors and diarrhea status were obtained by interviewing 378 consecutive participants (214 HIV positive and 164 HIV negative). Stool samples were collected from all study subjects and examined for parasites using direct, formol-ether and modified acid fast stain techniques.

RESULTS

The prevalence of any intestinal parasitic infection was significantly higher among HIV positive participants. Specifically, rate of infection with Cryptosporidium, I. belli, and S. stercoralis were higher, particularly in those with CD4 count less than 200 cells/microL. Diarrhea was more frequent also at the same lower CD4 T-cell counts.

CONCLUSION

Immunodeficiency increased the risk of having opportunistic parasites and diarrhea. Therefore; raising patient immune status and screening at least for those treatable parasites is important.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Gondar University, PO Box 196 Gondar, Ethiopia. shimelisassefa@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19765310

Citation

Assefa, Shimelis, et al. "Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Relation to HIV/AIDS Status, Diarrhea and CD4 T-cell Count." BMC Infectious Diseases, vol. 9, 2009, p. 155.
Assefa S, Erko B, Medhin G, et al. Intestinal parasitic infections in relation to HIV/AIDS status, diarrhea and CD4 T-cell count. BMC Infect Dis. 2009;9:155.
Assefa, S., Erko, B., Medhin, G., Assefa, Z., & Shimelis, T. (2009). Intestinal parasitic infections in relation to HIV/AIDS status, diarrhea and CD4 T-cell count. BMC Infectious Diseases, 9, 155. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-9-155
Assefa S, et al. Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Relation to HIV/AIDS Status, Diarrhea and CD4 T-cell Count. BMC Infect Dis. 2009 Sep 18;9:155. PubMed PMID: 19765310.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intestinal parasitic infections in relation to HIV/AIDS status, diarrhea and CD4 T-cell count. AU - Assefa,Shimelis, AU - Erko,Berhanu, AU - Medhin,Girmay, AU - Assefa,Zelalem, AU - Shimelis,Techalew, Y1 - 2009/09/18/ PY - 2009/06/03/received PY - 2009/09/18/accepted PY - 2009/9/22/entrez PY - 2009/9/22/pubmed PY - 2009/11/5/medline SP - 155 EP - 155 JF - BMC infectious diseases JO - BMC Infect Dis VL - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: HIV infection has been modifying both the epidemiology and outcome of parasitic infections. Hence, this study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among people with and without HIV infection and its association with diarrhea and CD4 T-cell count. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted at Hawassa Teaching and Referral Hospital focusing on HIV positive individuals, who gave blood for CD4 T-cell count at their first enrollment and clients tested HIV negative from November, 2008 to March, 2009. Data on socio-demographic factors and diarrhea status were obtained by interviewing 378 consecutive participants (214 HIV positive and 164 HIV negative). Stool samples were collected from all study subjects and examined for parasites using direct, formol-ether and modified acid fast stain techniques. RESULTS: The prevalence of any intestinal parasitic infection was significantly higher among HIV positive participants. Specifically, rate of infection with Cryptosporidium, I. belli, and S. stercoralis were higher, particularly in those with CD4 count less than 200 cells/microL. Diarrhea was more frequent also at the same lower CD4 T-cell counts. CONCLUSION: Immunodeficiency increased the risk of having opportunistic parasites and diarrhea. Therefore; raising patient immune status and screening at least for those treatable parasites is important. SN - 1471-2334 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19765310/Intestinal_parasitic_infections_in_relation_to_HIV/AIDS_status_diarrhea_and_CD4_T_cell_count_ L2 - https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2334-9-155 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -