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Vitamin D status, bone mineral density, and inflammation in kidney transplantation patients.
Transplant Proc. 2009 Sep; 41(7):2823-5.TP

Abstract

Vitamin D has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities in the healthy population and in various disease states. There are few data on the quantification of vitamin D status and inflammation with respect to changes in bone mineral density among renal transplantation patients. We analyzed the influence of vitamin D levels on allograft function and inflammatory status at the time of enrollment and at 1-year follow-up. Sixty-four renal transplant patients, including 38 males, showed an overall age of 38.61 +/- 1.05 years, had a mean graft age of 6.15 +/- 3.17 years. We excluded patients who had diabetes mellitus, chronic inflammatory disease, or chronic allograft nephropathy. We obtained pre- and posttransplantation serum samples and daily proteinuria on each patient. Measurements of bone mineral density were performed by dual-energy X-ray absortiometry. After enrollment, we followed the patients for 1 year. Thereafter we assessed serum creatinine, C-reactive protein, albumin, and spot urinary protein levels. The patients were divided into two groups based upon vitamin D levels: group I (n = 29), <20 microg/L versus group II (n = 35), >or=20 microg/L. There was no significant difference in intact parathyroid hormone levels between the two groups. Vitamin D level positively correlated with serum creatinine (r = .32, P = .01) and serum albumin levels (r = .28, P = .023) at the time of enrollment. At 1 year, patients in group I showed significantly higher creatinine (P < .001) and proteinuria levels (P < .05) than those in group II. Low vitamin D levels are not uncommon among renal transplant recipients. There was a significant association of vitamin D levels with renal allograft function. Low vitamin D levels may be a predictor of worsening of graft function and increasing proteinuria.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nephrology, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19765446

Citation

Sezer, S, et al. "Vitamin D Status, Bone Mineral Density, and Inflammation in Kidney Transplantation Patients." Transplantation Proceedings, vol. 41, no. 7, 2009, pp. 2823-5.
Sezer S, Yavuz D, Canoz MB, et al. Vitamin D status, bone mineral density, and inflammation in kidney transplantation patients. Transplant Proc. 2009;41(7):2823-5.
Sezer, S., Yavuz, D., Canoz, M. B., Ozdemir, F. N., & Haberal, M. (2009). Vitamin D status, bone mineral density, and inflammation in kidney transplantation patients. Transplantation Proceedings, 41(7), 2823-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2009.06.141
Sezer S, et al. Vitamin D Status, Bone Mineral Density, and Inflammation in Kidney Transplantation Patients. Transplant Proc. 2009;41(7):2823-5. PubMed PMID: 19765446.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D status, bone mineral density, and inflammation in kidney transplantation patients. AU - Sezer,S, AU - Yavuz,D, AU - Canoz,M B, AU - Ozdemir,F N, AU - Haberal,M, PY - 2009/9/22/entrez PY - 2009/9/22/pubmed PY - 2010/1/12/medline SP - 2823 EP - 5 JF - Transplantation proceedings JO - Transplant Proc VL - 41 IS - 7 N2 - Vitamin D has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities in the healthy population and in various disease states. There are few data on the quantification of vitamin D status and inflammation with respect to changes in bone mineral density among renal transplantation patients. We analyzed the influence of vitamin D levels on allograft function and inflammatory status at the time of enrollment and at 1-year follow-up. Sixty-four renal transplant patients, including 38 males, showed an overall age of 38.61 +/- 1.05 years, had a mean graft age of 6.15 +/- 3.17 years. We excluded patients who had diabetes mellitus, chronic inflammatory disease, or chronic allograft nephropathy. We obtained pre- and posttransplantation serum samples and daily proteinuria on each patient. Measurements of bone mineral density were performed by dual-energy X-ray absortiometry. After enrollment, we followed the patients for 1 year. Thereafter we assessed serum creatinine, C-reactive protein, albumin, and spot urinary protein levels. The patients were divided into two groups based upon vitamin D levels: group I (n = 29), <20 microg/L versus group II (n = 35), >or=20 microg/L. There was no significant difference in intact parathyroid hormone levels between the two groups. Vitamin D level positively correlated with serum creatinine (r = .32, P = .01) and serum albumin levels (r = .28, P = .023) at the time of enrollment. At 1 year, patients in group I showed significantly higher creatinine (P < .001) and proteinuria levels (P < .05) than those in group II. Low vitamin D levels are not uncommon among renal transplant recipients. There was a significant association of vitamin D levels with renal allograft function. Low vitamin D levels may be a predictor of worsening of graft function and increasing proteinuria. SN - 1873-2623 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19765446/Vitamin_D_status_bone_mineral_density_and_inflammation_in_kidney_transplantation_patients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0041-1345(09)00876-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -