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[Somatization and FSS].
Nihon Rinsho. 2009 Sep; 67(9):1677-82.NR

Abstract

In this paper, we discussed the relationship between somatization and functional somatic syndrome (FSS). The concept of somatization takes its origin from the work of Freud S who proposed the idea of conversion as a main defense mechanism. At the same period, the term somatization was introduced by Stekel W as a hypothetical process whereby a deep-seated conflict could cause a bodily disorder. After that, Alexander F developed the emotional equivalents, which had been also proposed by Freud S, into the concept of the vegetative neurosis and psychosomatic diseases. Recently, somatization tends to be defined as 'a tendency to experience and communicate somatic distress in response to psychosocial stress and to seek medical help for it' (Lipowski ZJ, 1988). So there seems to be a strong link among conversion, somatization, FSS, and somatization disorder.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychosomatic Internal Medicine, Yokohama-Rosai Hospital.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article
Review

Language

jpn

PubMed ID

19768900

Citation

Tsukui, Kaname, and Shoichi Ebana. "[Somatization and FSS]." Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical Medicine, vol. 67, no. 9, 2009, pp. 1677-82.
Tsukui K, Ebana S. [Somatization and FSS]. Nihon Rinsho. 2009;67(9):1677-82.
Tsukui, K., & Ebana, S. (2009). [Somatization and FSS]. Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical Medicine, 67(9), 1677-82.
Tsukui K, Ebana S. [Somatization and FSS]. Nihon Rinsho. 2009;67(9):1677-82. PubMed PMID: 19768900.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Somatization and FSS]. AU - Tsukui,Kaname, AU - Ebana,Shoichi, PY - 2009/9/23/entrez PY - 2009/9/23/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 1677 EP - 82 JF - Nihon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine JO - Nihon Rinsho VL - 67 IS - 9 N2 - In this paper, we discussed the relationship between somatization and functional somatic syndrome (FSS). The concept of somatization takes its origin from the work of Freud S who proposed the idea of conversion as a main defense mechanism. At the same period, the term somatization was introduced by Stekel W as a hypothetical process whereby a deep-seated conflict could cause a bodily disorder. After that, Alexander F developed the emotional equivalents, which had been also proposed by Freud S, into the concept of the vegetative neurosis and psychosomatic diseases. Recently, somatization tends to be defined as 'a tendency to experience and communicate somatic distress in response to psychosocial stress and to seek medical help for it' (Lipowski ZJ, 1988). So there seems to be a strong link among conversion, somatization, FSS, and somatization disorder. SN - 0047-1852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19768900/[Somatization_and_FSS]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -