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Excited state reactions in fluorescent proteins.
Chem Soc Rev. 2009 Oct; 38(10):2922-34.CS

Abstract

The green fluorescent protein is a key technology in bioimaging. In this critical review, we consider how its various applications can be tailored from knowledge of the excited state chemistry. The photophysics of the basic chromophore in solution are described in detail, and the dominant radiationless decay mechanism is characterised. The quite different photophysics of wild type GFP are described next. The unique excited state proton transfer reaction observed can be used to model proton transfer processes in proteins. Examples where the proton transfer is blocked, or redirected to occur over a low short barrier H-bond are discussed. Finally the photophysics underlying the new generation of photochemically active fluorescent proteins are discussed (155 references).

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK NR1 2QN. s.meech@uea.ac.uk

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19771336

Citation

Meech, Stephen R.. "Excited State Reactions in Fluorescent Proteins." Chemical Society Reviews, vol. 38, no. 10, 2009, pp. 2922-34.
Meech SR. Excited state reactions in fluorescent proteins. Chem Soc Rev. 2009;38(10):2922-34.
Meech, S. R. (2009). Excited state reactions in fluorescent proteins. Chemical Society Reviews, 38(10), 2922-34. https://doi.org/10.1039/b820168b
Meech SR. Excited State Reactions in Fluorescent Proteins. Chem Soc Rev. 2009;38(10):2922-34. PubMed PMID: 19771336.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Excited state reactions in fluorescent proteins. A1 - Meech,Stephen R, Y1 - 2009/08/25/ PY - 2009/9/23/entrez PY - 2009/9/23/pubmed PY - 2010/1/19/medline SP - 2922 EP - 34 JF - Chemical Society reviews JO - Chem Soc Rev VL - 38 IS - 10 N2 - The green fluorescent protein is a key technology in bioimaging. In this critical review, we consider how its various applications can be tailored from knowledge of the excited state chemistry. The photophysics of the basic chromophore in solution are described in detail, and the dominant radiationless decay mechanism is characterised. The quite different photophysics of wild type GFP are described next. The unique excited state proton transfer reaction observed can be used to model proton transfer processes in proteins. Examples where the proton transfer is blocked, or redirected to occur over a low short barrier H-bond are discussed. Finally the photophysics underlying the new generation of photochemically active fluorescent proteins are discussed (155 references). SN - 1460-4744 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19771336/Excited_state_reactions_in_fluorescent_proteins_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/b820168b DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -