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Effects of yoga on inner-city children's well-being: a pilot study.
Altern Ther Health Med 2009 Sep-Oct; 15(5):36-42AT

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine yoga's effects on inner-city children's well-being.

METHODS

This pilot study compared fourth- and fifth-grade students at 2 after-school programs in Bronx, New York. One program offered yoga 1 hour per week for 12 weeks (yoga) and the other program (non-yoga) did not. Preintervention and postintervention emotional well-being was assessed by Harter's Global Self-Worth and Physical Appearance subscales, which were the study's primary outcome measures. Secondary outcomes included other measures of emotional well-being assessed by 2 new scales: Perceptions of Physical Health and Yoga Teachings (including Negative Behaviors, Positive Behaviors, and Focusing/relaxation subscales). Preintervention and postintervention, physical wellbeing was assessed by measures of flexibility and balance. Subjective ratings ofyoga's effects on well-being were evaluated by an additional questionnaire completed by the yoga group only.

RESULTS

Data were collected from 78% (n=39) and 86.5% (n=32) of potential yoga and non-yoga study enrollees. No differences in baseline demographics were found. Controlling for preintervention well-being differences using analysis of covariance, we found that children in the yoga group had better postintervention Negative Behaviors scores and balance than the non-yoga group (P < .05). The majority of children participating in yoga reported enhanced wellbeing, as reflected by perceived improvements in behaviors directly targeted by yoga (e.g., strength, flexibility, balance).

CONCLUSIONS

Although no significant differences were found in the study's primary outcomes (global self-worth and perceptions of physical well-being), children participating in yoga reported using fewer negative behaviors in response to stress and had better balance than a comparison group. Improvements in wellbeing, specifically in behaviors directly targeted by yoga, were reported. These results suggest a possible role of yoga as a preventive intervention as well as a means of improving children's perceived well-being.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Flushing Hospital, Queens, New York, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19771929

Citation

Berger, Deborah L., et al. "Effects of Yoga On Inner-city Children's Well-being: a Pilot Study." Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, vol. 15, no. 5, 2009, pp. 36-42.
Berger DL, Silver EJ, Stein RE. Effects of yoga on inner-city children's well-being: a pilot study. Altern Ther Health Med. 2009;15(5):36-42.
Berger, D. L., Silver, E. J., & Stein, R. E. (2009). Effects of yoga on inner-city children's well-being: a pilot study. Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, 15(5), pp. 36-42.
Berger DL, Silver EJ, Stein RE. Effects of Yoga On Inner-city Children's Well-being: a Pilot Study. Altern Ther Health Med. 2009;15(5):36-42. PubMed PMID: 19771929.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of yoga on inner-city children's well-being: a pilot study. AU - Berger,Deborah L, AU - Silver,Ellen Johnson, AU - Stein,Ruth E K, PY - 2009/9/24/entrez PY - 2009/9/24/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 36 EP - 42 JF - Alternative therapies in health and medicine JO - Altern Ther Health Med VL - 15 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine yoga's effects on inner-city children's well-being. METHODS: This pilot study compared fourth- and fifth-grade students at 2 after-school programs in Bronx, New York. One program offered yoga 1 hour per week for 12 weeks (yoga) and the other program (non-yoga) did not. Preintervention and postintervention emotional well-being was assessed by Harter's Global Self-Worth and Physical Appearance subscales, which were the study's primary outcome measures. Secondary outcomes included other measures of emotional well-being assessed by 2 new scales: Perceptions of Physical Health and Yoga Teachings (including Negative Behaviors, Positive Behaviors, and Focusing/relaxation subscales). Preintervention and postintervention, physical wellbeing was assessed by measures of flexibility and balance. Subjective ratings ofyoga's effects on well-being were evaluated by an additional questionnaire completed by the yoga group only. RESULTS: Data were collected from 78% (n=39) and 86.5% (n=32) of potential yoga and non-yoga study enrollees. No differences in baseline demographics were found. Controlling for preintervention well-being differences using analysis of covariance, we found that children in the yoga group had better postintervention Negative Behaviors scores and balance than the non-yoga group (P < .05). The majority of children participating in yoga reported enhanced wellbeing, as reflected by perceived improvements in behaviors directly targeted by yoga (e.g., strength, flexibility, balance). CONCLUSIONS: Although no significant differences were found in the study's primary outcomes (global self-worth and perceptions of physical well-being), children participating in yoga reported using fewer negative behaviors in response to stress and had better balance than a comparison group. Improvements in wellbeing, specifically in behaviors directly targeted by yoga, were reported. These results suggest a possible role of yoga as a preventive intervention as well as a means of improving children's perceived well-being. SN - 1078-6791 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19771929/Effects_of_yoga_on_inner_city_children's_well_being:_a_pilot_study_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/childrenshealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -