Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Concurrent sexual partnerships and racial disparities in HIV infection among men who have sex with men.
Sex Transm Infect. 2009 Sep; 85(5):367-9.ST

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To measure the level of sexual partner concurrency and assess its potential role in explaining disparities in HIV prevalence by race/ethnicity among men who have sex with men (MSM).

METHODS

A cross-sectional, community-based survey of MSM in San Francisco was conducted in 2008 using time-location sampling. Four different measures of sexual partner concurrency were assessed and compared across race/ethnicity groups: overlap in time with the most recent sexual partners, knowledge of the most recent sexual partner having other partners, any overlap with up to the last five partners and complete overlap with up to the last five partners.

RESULTS

A total of 521 MSM was recruited; 10% self-described their race/ethnicity as black, 62% as white, 25% as Latino and 9% as Asian (not mutually exclusive). Black MSM had fewer sexual partners overall, yet had three times the odds that all their partnerships were concurrent compared with non-black MSM (39% vs 17%, respectively, p = 0.034). None of the other measures of concurrency showed racial/ethnic differences. MSM whose partnerships were completely concurrent had a higher number of sexual episodes and unprotected sexual episodes per partnership compared with those whose partners were not completely concurrent.

CONCLUSIONS

Findings support the hypothesis that the sexual networks of black MSM rather than individual behaviours account for their higher prevalence of HIV compared with non-black MSM. There remains the need specifically to validate different concurrency measures in larger samples and directly assess them as risk factors for acquiring HIV infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19773457

Citation

Bohl, D D., et al. "Concurrent Sexual Partnerships and Racial Disparities in HIV Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men." Sexually Transmitted Infections, vol. 85, no. 5, 2009, pp. 367-9.
Bohl DD, Raymond HF, Arnold M, et al. Concurrent sexual partnerships and racial disparities in HIV infection among men who have sex with men. Sex Transm Infect. 2009;85(5):367-9.
Bohl, D. D., Raymond, H. F., Arnold, M., & McFarland, W. (2009). Concurrent sexual partnerships and racial disparities in HIV infection among men who have sex with men. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 85(5), 367-9. https://doi.org/10.1136/sti.2009.036723
Bohl DD, et al. Concurrent Sexual Partnerships and Racial Disparities in HIV Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men. Sex Transm Infect. 2009;85(5):367-9. PubMed PMID: 19773457.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Concurrent sexual partnerships and racial disparities in HIV infection among men who have sex with men. AU - Bohl,D D, AU - Raymond,H F, AU - Arnold,M, AU - McFarland,W, PY - 2009/9/24/entrez PY - 2009/9/24/pubmed PY - 2009/11/13/medline SP - 367 EP - 9 JF - Sexually transmitted infections JO - Sex Transm Infect VL - 85 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To measure the level of sexual partner concurrency and assess its potential role in explaining disparities in HIV prevalence by race/ethnicity among men who have sex with men (MSM). METHODS: A cross-sectional, community-based survey of MSM in San Francisco was conducted in 2008 using time-location sampling. Four different measures of sexual partner concurrency were assessed and compared across race/ethnicity groups: overlap in time with the most recent sexual partners, knowledge of the most recent sexual partner having other partners, any overlap with up to the last five partners and complete overlap with up to the last five partners. RESULTS: A total of 521 MSM was recruited; 10% self-described their race/ethnicity as black, 62% as white, 25% as Latino and 9% as Asian (not mutually exclusive). Black MSM had fewer sexual partners overall, yet had three times the odds that all their partnerships were concurrent compared with non-black MSM (39% vs 17%, respectively, p = 0.034). None of the other measures of concurrency showed racial/ethnic differences. MSM whose partnerships were completely concurrent had a higher number of sexual episodes and unprotected sexual episodes per partnership compared with those whose partners were not completely concurrent. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support the hypothesis that the sexual networks of black MSM rather than individual behaviours account for their higher prevalence of HIV compared with non-black MSM. There remains the need specifically to validate different concurrency measures in larger samples and directly assess them as risk factors for acquiring HIV infection. SN - 1472-3263 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19773457/Concurrent_sexual_partnerships_and_racial_disparities_in_HIV_infection_among_men_who_have_sex_with_men_ L2 - http://sti.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19773457 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -