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Symptoms and signs in culture-proven acute maxillary sinusitis in a general practice population.
APMIS. 2009 Oct; 117(10):724-9.A

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess symptoms and signs in patients with maxillary sinusitis and a bacteriological diagnosis obtained by sinus aspiration or lavage. Designed as a prospective cohort study in general practice, the study included 174 patients, aged 18-65 years, suspected of having acute maxillary sinusitis by their general practitioner. The main outcome measures were the independent association of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration and confirmed infection with the predominant bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. The predominant organisms found in patients with acute maxillary sinusitis were S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Body temperature >38 degrees C and maxillary toothache were significantly associated with the presence of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Positive bacteriological culture results were significantly associated with increasing ESR and CRP values. None of the symptoms and signs, with the exception of body temperature >38 degrees C and maxillary toothache, were particularly sensitive indicators of the specific aetiology in patients with acute maxillary sinusitis. Elevated ESR and CRP values were significantly associated with positive bacteriological culture results. On the other hand, absence of these symptoms and signs did not exclude the presence of acute maxillary sinusitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

General Practice Lindenborgvej, Lindenborgvej 93, Aalborg SV, Denmark. jensgeorg@dadlnet.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19775340

Citation

Hansen, Jens Georg, et al. "Symptoms and Signs in Culture-proven Acute Maxillary Sinusitis in a General Practice Population." APMIS : Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica, Et Immunologica Scandinavica, vol. 117, no. 10, 2009, pp. 724-9.
Hansen JG, Højbjerg T, Rosborg J. Symptoms and signs in culture-proven acute maxillary sinusitis in a general practice population. APMIS. 2009;117(10):724-9.
Hansen, J. G., Højbjerg, T., & Rosborg, J. (2009). Symptoms and signs in culture-proven acute maxillary sinusitis in a general practice population. APMIS : Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica, Et Immunologica Scandinavica, 117(10), 724-9. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0463.2009.02526.x
Hansen JG, Højbjerg T, Rosborg J. Symptoms and Signs in Culture-proven Acute Maxillary Sinusitis in a General Practice Population. APMIS. 2009;117(10):724-9. PubMed PMID: 19775340.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Symptoms and signs in culture-proven acute maxillary sinusitis in a general practice population. AU - Hansen,Jens Georg, AU - Højbjerg,Tove, AU - Rosborg,Jørn, PY - 2009/9/25/entrez PY - 2009/9/25/pubmed PY - 2009/10/7/medline SP - 724 EP - 9 JF - APMIS : acta pathologica, microbiologica, et immunologica Scandinavica JO - APMIS VL - 117 IS - 10 N2 - The objective of this study was to assess symptoms and signs in patients with maxillary sinusitis and a bacteriological diagnosis obtained by sinus aspiration or lavage. Designed as a prospective cohort study in general practice, the study included 174 patients, aged 18-65 years, suspected of having acute maxillary sinusitis by their general practitioner. The main outcome measures were the independent association of symptoms, signs, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration and confirmed infection with the predominant bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. The predominant organisms found in patients with acute maxillary sinusitis were S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Body temperature >38 degrees C and maxillary toothache were significantly associated with the presence of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Positive bacteriological culture results were significantly associated with increasing ESR and CRP values. None of the symptoms and signs, with the exception of body temperature >38 degrees C and maxillary toothache, were particularly sensitive indicators of the specific aetiology in patients with acute maxillary sinusitis. Elevated ESR and CRP values were significantly associated with positive bacteriological culture results. On the other hand, absence of these symptoms and signs did not exclude the presence of acute maxillary sinusitis. SN - 1600-0463 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19775340/Symptoms_and_signs_in_culture_proven_acute_maxillary_sinusitis_in_a_general_practice_population_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0463.2009.02526.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -