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Magnetic resonance imaging in dogs with neurologic impairment due to acute thoracic and lumbar intervertebral disk herniation.
J Vet Intern Med. 2009 Nov-Dec; 23(6):1220-6.JV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a correlate to physical examination in various myelopathies and a predictor of functional outcome.

OBJECTIVES

To describe associations among MRI features, neurological dysfunction before MRI, and functional outcome in dogs with disk herniation.

ANIMALS

One hundred and fifty-nine dogs with acute thoracolumbar disk herniation.

METHODS

Retrospective case series. Signalment, initial neurological function as assessed by a modified Frankel score (MFS), and ambulatory outcome at hospital discharge and >3 months (long-term) follow-up were recorded from medical records and telephone interview of owners. Associations were estimated between these parameters and MRI signal and morphometric data.

RESULTS

Dogs with intramedullary T2W hyperintensity had more severe pre-MRI MFS (median 2, range 0-4) and lower ambulatory proportion at long-term follow-up (0.76) than those dogs lacking hyperintensity (median MFS 3, range 0-5; ambulatory proportion, 0.93) (P=.001 and .013, respectively). Each unit of T2W length ratio was associated with a 1.9 times lower odds of long-term ambulation when adjusted for pre-MRI MFS (95% confidence interval 1.0-3.52, P=.05). Dogs with a compressive length ratio >1.31 (which was the median ratio within this population) had more severe pre-MRI MFS (median 3, range 0-5) compared with those with ratios < or =1.31 (median MFS 3, range 0-4; P=.006).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE

MRI features were associated with initial injury severity in dogs with thoracolumbar disk herniation. Based on results of this study, the T2W length ratio and presence of T2W intramedullary hyperintensity appear to be predictive of long-term ambulatory status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA. jlevine@cvm.tamu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19780928

Citation

Levine, J M., et al. "Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Dogs With Neurologic Impairment Due to Acute Thoracic and Lumbar Intervertebral Disk Herniation." Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, vol. 23, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1220-6.
Levine JM, Fosgate GT, Chen AV, et al. Magnetic resonance imaging in dogs with neurologic impairment due to acute thoracic and lumbar intervertebral disk herniation. J Vet Intern Med. 2009;23(6):1220-6.
Levine, J. M., Fosgate, G. T., Chen, A. V., Rushing, R., Nghiem, P. P., Platt, S. R., Bagley, R. S., Kent, M., Hicks, D. G., Young, B. D., & Schatzberg, S. J. (2009). Magnetic resonance imaging in dogs with neurologic impairment due to acute thoracic and lumbar intervertebral disk herniation. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 23(6), 1220-6. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-1676.2009.0393.x
Levine JM, et al. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Dogs With Neurologic Impairment Due to Acute Thoracic and Lumbar Intervertebral Disk Herniation. J Vet Intern Med. 2009 Nov-Dec;23(6):1220-6. PubMed PMID: 19780928.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Magnetic resonance imaging in dogs with neurologic impairment due to acute thoracic and lumbar intervertebral disk herniation. AU - Levine,J M, AU - Fosgate,G T, AU - Chen,A V, AU - Rushing,R, AU - Nghiem,P P, AU - Platt,S R, AU - Bagley,R S, AU - Kent,M, AU - Hicks,D G, AU - Young,B D, AU - Schatzberg,S J, Y1 - 2009/09/22/ PY - 2009/9/29/entrez PY - 2009/9/29/pubmed PY - 2010/1/22/medline SP - 1220 EP - 6 JF - Journal of veterinary internal medicine JO - J. Vet. Intern. Med. VL - 23 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a correlate to physical examination in various myelopathies and a predictor of functional outcome. OBJECTIVES: To describe associations among MRI features, neurological dysfunction before MRI, and functional outcome in dogs with disk herniation. ANIMALS: One hundred and fifty-nine dogs with acute thoracolumbar disk herniation. METHODS: Retrospective case series. Signalment, initial neurological function as assessed by a modified Frankel score (MFS), and ambulatory outcome at hospital discharge and >3 months (long-term) follow-up were recorded from medical records and telephone interview of owners. Associations were estimated between these parameters and MRI signal and morphometric data. RESULTS: Dogs with intramedullary T2W hyperintensity had more severe pre-MRI MFS (median 2, range 0-4) and lower ambulatory proportion at long-term follow-up (0.76) than those dogs lacking hyperintensity (median MFS 3, range 0-5; ambulatory proportion, 0.93) (P=.001 and .013, respectively). Each unit of T2W length ratio was associated with a 1.9 times lower odds of long-term ambulation when adjusted for pre-MRI MFS (95% confidence interval 1.0-3.52, P=.05). Dogs with a compressive length ratio >1.31 (which was the median ratio within this population) had more severe pre-MRI MFS (median 3, range 0-5) compared with those with ratios < or =1.31 (median MFS 3, range 0-4; P=.006). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: MRI features were associated with initial injury severity in dogs with thoracolumbar disk herniation. Based on results of this study, the T2W length ratio and presence of T2W intramedullary hyperintensity appear to be predictive of long-term ambulatory status. SN - 0891-6640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19780928/Magnetic_resonance_imaging_in_dogs_with_neurologic_impairment_due_to_acute_thoracic_and_lumbar_intervertebral_disk_herniation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-1676.2009.0393.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -