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Rice consumption in the United States: recent evidence from food consumption surveys.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Oct; 109(10):1719-27.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little is known about rice consumption, related food intake patterns, and the nutritional contribution that rice provides in the diets of Americans.

OBJECTIVE

To provide information about rice consumption in the United States and the diets of rice consumers.

DESIGN

Data come from the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (1994-1996) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2001-2002). Respondents report 24-hour recall dietary intakes. The amount of rice available in foods is estimated using the Food Commodity Intake Database. Consumers are classified based on the amount of rice they consume in foods.

SUBJECTS

The analysis includes information from adult individuals: 9,318 from the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals and 4,744 from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

STATISTICS

Weighted percentages and mean values show the food and nutrient intake amounts. Logistic regression analysis is used to examine relationships among economic, social, and demographic factors that affect rice consumption.

RESULTS

Rice is consumed by a significant portion of the US adult population. Compared with others who did not consume rice, rice consumers consumed a smaller share of energy per day from fat and saturated fat; more iron and potassium; and more dietary fiber, meat, vegetables, and grains. Race/ethnicity and education are determinants of the probability of consuming rice, and more so than low-income status.

CONCLUSIONS

Rice consumers choose a diet that includes more vegetables, a smaller share of energy from fat and saturated fat, more dietary fiber and more iron than those who do not consume rice; the differences have remained relatively stable over the last decade. Accounting for race/ethnicity and income levels is important for better understanding of factors that affect food choices and for effective design of dietary interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Agricultural and RuralDevelopment, Department of Economics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1070, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19782171

Citation

Batres-Marquez, S Patricia, et al. "Rice Consumption in the United States: Recent Evidence From Food Consumption Surveys." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 109, no. 10, 2009, pp. 1719-27.
Batres-Marquez SP, Jensen HH, Upton J. Rice consumption in the United States: recent evidence from food consumption surveys. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(10):1719-27.
Batres-Marquez, S. P., Jensen, H. H., & Upton, J. (2009). Rice consumption in the United States: recent evidence from food consumption surveys. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 109(10), 1719-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jada.2009.07.010
Batres-Marquez SP, Jensen HH, Upton J. Rice Consumption in the United States: Recent Evidence From Food Consumption Surveys. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109(10):1719-27. PubMed PMID: 19782171.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rice consumption in the United States: recent evidence from food consumption surveys. AU - Batres-Marquez,S Patricia, AU - Jensen,Helen H, AU - Upton,Julie, PY - 2006/04/23/received PY - 2009/05/08/accepted PY - 2009/9/29/entrez PY - 2009/9/29/pubmed PY - 2009/10/29/medline SP - 1719 EP - 27 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 109 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little is known about rice consumption, related food intake patterns, and the nutritional contribution that rice provides in the diets of Americans. OBJECTIVE: To provide information about rice consumption in the United States and the diets of rice consumers. DESIGN: Data come from the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (1994-1996) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2001-2002). Respondents report 24-hour recall dietary intakes. The amount of rice available in foods is estimated using the Food Commodity Intake Database. Consumers are classified based on the amount of rice they consume in foods. SUBJECTS: The analysis includes information from adult individuals: 9,318 from the Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals and 4,744 from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. STATISTICS: Weighted percentages and mean values show the food and nutrient intake amounts. Logistic regression analysis is used to examine relationships among economic, social, and demographic factors that affect rice consumption. RESULTS: Rice is consumed by a significant portion of the US adult population. Compared with others who did not consume rice, rice consumers consumed a smaller share of energy per day from fat and saturated fat; more iron and potassium; and more dietary fiber, meat, vegetables, and grains. Race/ethnicity and education are determinants of the probability of consuming rice, and more so than low-income status. CONCLUSIONS: Rice consumers choose a diet that includes more vegetables, a smaller share of energy from fat and saturated fat, more dietary fiber and more iron than those who do not consume rice; the differences have remained relatively stable over the last decade. Accounting for race/ethnicity and income levels is important for better understanding of factors that affect food choices and for effective design of dietary interventions. SN - 1878-3570 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19782171/Rice_consumption_in_the_United_States:_recent_evidence_from_food_consumption_surveys_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(09)01269-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -