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Cannabis withdrawal severity and short-term course among cannabis-dependent adolescent and young adult inpatients.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

While previous studies questioned the existence of a cannabis withdrawal syndrome (CWS), recent research provided increasing evidence of a number of clinical symptoms after cessation of frequent cannabis consumption. The aim of this study is to prospectively assess the course of CWS in a sample of cannabis-dependent inpatients and to provide an estimate of the proportion of subjects experiencing CWS.

METHODS

118 subjects, aged 16-36 years, diagnosed with a cannabis dependence (DSM-IV, assessed by SCID I) were enrolled in the study. CWS was assessed prospectively over 10 days using a modified version of the Marijuana Withdrawal Checklist. Personality dimensions were assessed with the NEO-FFI.

RESULTS

73 subjects (61.3%) completed all assessments over the observation period. Most symptoms peaked on day 1. Model-based analyses revealed a high and low intensity CWS group. Less than half of the patients belonged to the high intensity craving, psychological, or physical withdrawal symptoms group. Symptom intensity decreased almost linearly over time. Indicators of cannabis consumption intensity as well as personality dimensions, but not recalled withdrawal were related to membership in the high intensity CWS group.

DISCUSSION

A clinically relevant CWS may only be expected in a subgroup of cannabis-dependent patients. Most subjects with an elevated CWS experience physical and psychological symptoms. The small to negligible associations between recalled and prospectively assessed symptoms raise questions about the validity of the former approach.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapie and Psychosomatics, Martin-Luther University, Julius-Kühn-Strasse 7, Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), Halle/Saale, Germany. ulrich.preuss@medizin.uni-halle.de

    , , ,

    Source

    Drug and alcohol dependence 106:2-3 2010 Jan 15 pg 133-41

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
    Female
    Germany
    Hospitalization
    Hospitals, Psychiatric
    Humans
    Informed Consent
    Interviews as Topic
    Male
    Marijuana Abuse
    Patient Selection
    Personality
    Prospective Studies
    Severity of Illness Index
    Smoking
    Substance Withdrawal Syndrome
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19783382

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabis withdrawal severity and short-term course among cannabis-dependent adolescent and young adult inpatients. AU - Preuss,U W, AU - Watzke,A B, AU - Zimmermann,J, AU - Wong,J W M, AU - Schmidt,C O, Y1 - 2009/09/23/ PY - 2008/12/22/received PY - 2009/8/5/revised PY - 2009/8/7/accepted PY - 2009/9/23/aheadofprint PY - 2009/9/29/entrez PY - 2009/9/29/pubmed PY - 2010/4/24/medline SP - 133 EP - 41 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 106 IS - 2-3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: While previous studies questioned the existence of a cannabis withdrawal syndrome (CWS), recent research provided increasing evidence of a number of clinical symptoms after cessation of frequent cannabis consumption. The aim of this study is to prospectively assess the course of CWS in a sample of cannabis-dependent inpatients and to provide an estimate of the proportion of subjects experiencing CWS. METHODS: 118 subjects, aged 16-36 years, diagnosed with a cannabis dependence (DSM-IV, assessed by SCID I) were enrolled in the study. CWS was assessed prospectively over 10 days using a modified version of the Marijuana Withdrawal Checklist. Personality dimensions were assessed with the NEO-FFI. RESULTS: 73 subjects (61.3%) completed all assessments over the observation period. Most symptoms peaked on day 1. Model-based analyses revealed a high and low intensity CWS group. Less than half of the patients belonged to the high intensity craving, psychological, or physical withdrawal symptoms group. Symptom intensity decreased almost linearly over time. Indicators of cannabis consumption intensity as well as personality dimensions, but not recalled withdrawal were related to membership in the high intensity CWS group. DISCUSSION: A clinically relevant CWS may only be expected in a subgroup of cannabis-dependent patients. Most subjects with an elevated CWS experience physical and psychological symptoms. The small to negligible associations between recalled and prospectively assessed symptoms raise questions about the validity of the former approach. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19783382/abstract/Cannabis_withdrawal_severity_and_short_term_course_among_cannabis_dependent_adolescent_and_young_adult_inpatients_ L2 - http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(09)00327-5 ER -