Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Daily marijuana users with past alcohol problems increase alcohol consumption during marijuana abstinence.
Drug Alcohol Depend 2010; 106(2-3):111-8DA

Abstract

Drug abuse treatment programs typically recommend complete abstinence because of a fear that clients who stop use of one drug will substitute another. A within-subjects study investigated whether consumption of alcohol and other substances changes during marijuana abstinence. Twenty-eight daily marijuana users who were not trying to stop or reduce their marijuana consumption completed an 8-day baseline period in which they used marijuana and other drugs as usual, a 13-day marijuana abstinence period, and a 7-day return-to-baseline period. Participants provided self-report of substance use daily and submitted urine samples twice weekly to verify marijuana abstinence. A diagnosis of past alcohol abuse or dependence significantly moderated the alcohol increase from baseline to marijuana abstinence (p<0.01), such that individuals with this diagnosis significantly increased alcohol use (52% increase) but those without this history did not (3% increase). Increases in marijuana withdrawal discomfort scores and alcohol craving scores from baseline to marijuana abstinence significantly and positively correlated with increases in alcohol use. Increases in cigarettes, caffeine, and non-marijuana illicit drugs did not occur. This study provides empirical validation of drug substitution in a subgroup of daily marijuana users, but results need to be replicated in individuals who seek treatment for marijuana problems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Yale University School of Medicine, The APT Foundation, One Long Wharf, New Haven, CT 06511, USA. erica.peters@yale.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19783385

Citation

Peters, Erica N., and John R. Hughes. "Daily Marijuana Users With Past Alcohol Problems Increase Alcohol Consumption During Marijuana Abstinence." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 106, no. 2-3, 2010, pp. 111-8.
Peters EN, Hughes JR. Daily marijuana users with past alcohol problems increase alcohol consumption during marijuana abstinence. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010;106(2-3):111-8.
Peters, E. N., & Hughes, J. R. (2010). Daily marijuana users with past alcohol problems increase alcohol consumption during marijuana abstinence. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 106(2-3), pp. 111-8. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2009.07.027.
Peters EN, Hughes JR. Daily Marijuana Users With Past Alcohol Problems Increase Alcohol Consumption During Marijuana Abstinence. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010 Jan 15;106(2-3):111-8. PubMed PMID: 19783385.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Daily marijuana users with past alcohol problems increase alcohol consumption during marijuana abstinence. AU - Peters,Erica N, AU - Hughes,John R, Y1 - 2009/09/23/ PY - 2009/06/01/received PY - 2009/07/29/revised PY - 2009/07/30/accepted PY - 2009/9/29/entrez PY - 2009/9/29/pubmed PY - 2010/4/24/medline SP - 111 EP - 8 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 106 IS - 2-3 N2 - Drug abuse treatment programs typically recommend complete abstinence because of a fear that clients who stop use of one drug will substitute another. A within-subjects study investigated whether consumption of alcohol and other substances changes during marijuana abstinence. Twenty-eight daily marijuana users who were not trying to stop or reduce their marijuana consumption completed an 8-day baseline period in which they used marijuana and other drugs as usual, a 13-day marijuana abstinence period, and a 7-day return-to-baseline period. Participants provided self-report of substance use daily and submitted urine samples twice weekly to verify marijuana abstinence. A diagnosis of past alcohol abuse or dependence significantly moderated the alcohol increase from baseline to marijuana abstinence (p<0.01), such that individuals with this diagnosis significantly increased alcohol use (52% increase) but those without this history did not (3% increase). Increases in marijuana withdrawal discomfort scores and alcohol craving scores from baseline to marijuana abstinence significantly and positively correlated with increases in alcohol use. Increases in cigarettes, caffeine, and non-marijuana illicit drugs did not occur. This study provides empirical validation of drug substitution in a subgroup of daily marijuana users, but results need to be replicated in individuals who seek treatment for marijuana problems. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19783385/full_citation/Daily_marijuana_users_with_past_alcohol_problems_increase_alcohol_consumption_during_marijuana_abstinence_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(09)00325-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -