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Association of trans fatty acid intake with metabolic risk factors among free-living young Japanese women.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2009; 18(3):359-71.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We examined cross-sectional associations of total, hydrogenated, and natural trans fatty acid intake with selected metabolic risk factors in young Japanese women.

METHODS

Subjects were 1136 Japanese female dietetic students aged 18-22 years. Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. Associations between trans fatty acid intake and metabolic risk factors were examined with multivariate linear regression analysis, with control for potential covariates. Dietary covariates included intake of energy, total fat, and saturated fatty acids (model 1); monounsaturated fatty acids instead of saturated fatty acids (model 2); and polyunsaturated fatty acids instead of saturated fatty acids (model 3).

RESULTS

Mean (standard deviation) total trans fatty acid intake was 0.90% (0.30%) of total energy. Hydrogenated trans fatty acids contributed 77% of total trans fatty acid intake. Total trans fatty acid intake was significantly and positively associated with waist circumference, triacylglycerol, and glycated hemoglobin, except in the analysis of triacylglycerol with adjustment for monounsaturated fatty acids. No associations were found between total trans fatty acid intake and body mass index, cholesterol, or glucose. Hydrogenated trans fatty acid intake was significantly and positively associated only with waist circumference and glycated hemoglobin. No association was observed for natural trans fatty acid intake.

CONCLUSION

hydrogenated trans fatty acid intake was positively associated with several metabolic risk factors among free-living young Japanese women with relatively low intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19786384

Citation

Yamada, Mai, et al. "Association of Trans Fatty Acid Intake With Metabolic Risk Factors Among Free-living Young Japanese Women." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 18, no. 3, 2009, pp. 359-71.
Yamada M, Sasaki S, Murakami K, et al. Association of trans fatty acid intake with metabolic risk factors among free-living young Japanese women. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2009;18(3):359-71.
Yamada, M., Sasaki, S., Murakami, K., Takahashi, Y., & Uenishi, K. (2009). Association of trans fatty acid intake with metabolic risk factors among free-living young Japanese women. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 18(3), 359-71.
Yamada M, et al. Association of Trans Fatty Acid Intake With Metabolic Risk Factors Among Free-living Young Japanese Women. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2009;18(3):359-71. PubMed PMID: 19786384.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of trans fatty acid intake with metabolic risk factors among free-living young Japanese women. AU - Yamada,Mai, AU - Sasaki,Satoshi, AU - Murakami,Kentaro, AU - Takahashi,Yoshiko, AU - Uenishi,Kazuhiro, AU - ,, PY - 2009/9/30/entrez PY - 2009/9/30/pubmed PY - 2009/12/19/medline SP - 359 EP - 71 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined cross-sectional associations of total, hydrogenated, and natural trans fatty acid intake with selected metabolic risk factors in young Japanese women. METHODS: Subjects were 1136 Japanese female dietetic students aged 18-22 years. Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. Associations between trans fatty acid intake and metabolic risk factors were examined with multivariate linear regression analysis, with control for potential covariates. Dietary covariates included intake of energy, total fat, and saturated fatty acids (model 1); monounsaturated fatty acids instead of saturated fatty acids (model 2); and polyunsaturated fatty acids instead of saturated fatty acids (model 3). RESULTS: Mean (standard deviation) total trans fatty acid intake was 0.90% (0.30%) of total energy. Hydrogenated trans fatty acids contributed 77% of total trans fatty acid intake. Total trans fatty acid intake was significantly and positively associated with waist circumference, triacylglycerol, and glycated hemoglobin, except in the analysis of triacylglycerol with adjustment for monounsaturated fatty acids. No associations were found between total trans fatty acid intake and body mass index, cholesterol, or glucose. Hydrogenated trans fatty acid intake was significantly and positively associated only with waist circumference and glycated hemoglobin. No association was observed for natural trans fatty acid intake. CONCLUSION: hydrogenated trans fatty acid intake was positively associated with several metabolic risk factors among free-living young Japanese women with relatively low intake. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19786384/Association_of_trans_fatty_acid_intake_with_metabolic_risk_factors_among_free_living_young_Japanese_women_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/18/3/359.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -