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Neonatal S100B protein levels after prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.
Pediatrics. 2009 Oct; 124(4):e662-70.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study investigated neonatal S100B levels as a biomarker of prenatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) exposure.

METHODS

Maternal (delivery; N = 53) and neonatal (cord; N = 52) serum S100B levels were compared between prenatally SSRI-exposed (maternal, N = 36; neonatal, N = 37; duration: 230 +/- 71 days) and nonexposed (maternal, N = 17; neonatal, N = 15) groups. Measures of maternal depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed during the third trimester (33-36 weeks), and neonatal outcomes, including Apgar scores, birth weight, gestational age at birth, and symptoms of poor neonatal adaptation, were recorded.

RESULTS

S100B levels were significantly lower in prenatally SSRI-exposed neonates than in nonexposed neonates, controlling for gestational age and third-trimester maternal mood (P = .036). In contrast, SSRI-exposed mothers had significantly higher maternal serum S100B levels, compared with nonexposed mothers (P = .014), even controlling for maternal mood in the third trimester. S100B levels were not associated with maternal or neonatal drug levels, duration of prenatal exposure, demographic variables, or risk for poor neonatal adaptation.

CONCLUSIONS

Prenatal SSRI exposure was associated with decreased neonatal serum S100B levels, controlling for prenatal maternal mood. Neonatal S100B levels did not reflect neonatal behavioral outcomes and were not related to pharmacologic indices. These findings are consistent with prenatal alcohol and cocaine exposures, which also alter central serotonin levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19786426

Citation

Pawluski, Jodi L., et al. "Neonatal S100B Protein Levels After Prenatal Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors." Pediatrics, vol. 124, no. 4, 2009, pp. e662-70.
Pawluski JL, Galea LA, Brain U, et al. Neonatal S100B protein levels after prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Pediatrics. 2009;124(4):e662-70.
Pawluski, J. L., Galea, L. A., Brain, U., Papsdorf, M., & Oberlander, T. F. (2009). Neonatal S100B protein levels after prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Pediatrics, 124(4), e662-70. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-0442
Pawluski JL, et al. Neonatal S100B Protein Levels After Prenatal Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. Pediatrics. 2009;124(4):e662-70. PubMed PMID: 19786426.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neonatal S100B protein levels after prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. AU - Pawluski,Jodi L, AU - Galea,Liisa A M, AU - Brain,Ursula, AU - Papsdorf,Michael, AU - Oberlander,Tim F, Y1 - 2009/09/28/ PY - 2009/9/30/entrez PY - 2009/9/30/pubmed PY - 2009/10/24/medline SP - e662 EP - 70 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 124 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study investigated neonatal S100B levels as a biomarker of prenatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) exposure. METHODS: Maternal (delivery; N = 53) and neonatal (cord; N = 52) serum S100B levels were compared between prenatally SSRI-exposed (maternal, N = 36; neonatal, N = 37; duration: 230 +/- 71 days) and nonexposed (maternal, N = 17; neonatal, N = 15) groups. Measures of maternal depression and anxiety symptoms were assessed during the third trimester (33-36 weeks), and neonatal outcomes, including Apgar scores, birth weight, gestational age at birth, and symptoms of poor neonatal adaptation, were recorded. RESULTS: S100B levels were significantly lower in prenatally SSRI-exposed neonates than in nonexposed neonates, controlling for gestational age and third-trimester maternal mood (P = .036). In contrast, SSRI-exposed mothers had significantly higher maternal serum S100B levels, compared with nonexposed mothers (P = .014), even controlling for maternal mood in the third trimester. S100B levels were not associated with maternal or neonatal drug levels, duration of prenatal exposure, demographic variables, or risk for poor neonatal adaptation. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal SSRI exposure was associated with decreased neonatal serum S100B levels, controlling for prenatal maternal mood. Neonatal S100B levels did not reflect neonatal behavioral outcomes and were not related to pharmacologic indices. These findings are consistent with prenatal alcohol and cocaine exposures, which also alter central serotonin levels. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19786426/Neonatal_S100B_protein_levels_after_prenatal_exposure_to_selective_serotonin_reuptake_inhibitors_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19786426 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -