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Illness and injury to travelers and access to dental care on a research expedition to Mongolia.
J Travel Med. 2009 Sep-Oct; 16(5):328-31.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Expeditions provide an opportunity for travelers to undertake specialized travel to more extreme destinations in the security of an expeditionary group with medical coverage. Little is known about the illnesses and injuries occurring to expeditioners in Mongolia or access to dental care in the local population. This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of health problems suffered by travelers and managed among the local population on a research expedition to Mongolia.

METHODS

In June 2005, the expedition physician (MTMS) and dentist (DD) prospectively diagnosed and recorded all illnesses and injuries among 16 travelers (eight males and eight females) as well as any indigenous people on a 22-day paleontological expedition to the Mongolian Gobi Desert.

RESULTS

There were 53 health presentations and 14 dental problems among the indigenous population and the Mongolian escort. Males and females presented in equal proportions with the average age of 49 years (SD = 16). Presentations involved locomotor/accident (32%), dermatological (23%), gastrointestinal (19%), neurological (17%), psychological (6%), and with other systems (11%). Most accidents were due to lacerations (85%). Presentations were highest on days 4 and 5 (10% or 18%). Females were significantly more likely to present later in the expedition (p= 0.013). One quarter (25%) were handled conservatively with 28% requiring topical treatments with others requiring antiemetics (9%) and anti-inflammatory drugs (4%). There were no dental concerns reported among the expeditioners, although there were 14 cases among the indigenous population. While there were no deaths on the expedition, there were two major incidents, one of which required emergency evacuation.

CONCLUSIONS

The health problems encountered were largely similar to those reported for other expeditions. The most common problems included trauma as well as dermatological, dental, gastrointestinal, and neurological conditions. It is important that expedition teams are prepared to manage common problems, such as trauma and dental lesions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Worldwise Travelers Health Centers of New Zealand, Auckland, New Zealand. doctors@worldwise.co.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19796103

Citation

Shaw, Marc T M., et al. "Illness and Injury to Travelers and Access to Dental Care On a Research Expedition to Mongolia." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 16, no. 5, 2009, pp. 328-31.
Shaw MT, Daniels D, Leggat PA. Illness and injury to travelers and access to dental care on a research expedition to Mongolia. J Travel Med. 2009;16(5):328-31.
Shaw, M. T., Daniels, D., & Leggat, P. A. (2009). Illness and injury to travelers and access to dental care on a research expedition to Mongolia. Journal of Travel Medicine, 16(5), 328-31. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2009.00319.x
Shaw MT, Daniels D, Leggat PA. Illness and Injury to Travelers and Access to Dental Care On a Research Expedition to Mongolia. J Travel Med. 2009 Sep-Oct;16(5):328-31. PubMed PMID: 19796103.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Illness and injury to travelers and access to dental care on a research expedition to Mongolia. AU - Shaw,Marc T M, AU - Daniels,David, AU - Leggat,Peter A, PY - 2009/10/3/entrez PY - 2009/10/3/pubmed PY - 2010/1/30/medline SP - 328 EP - 31 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 16 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Expeditions provide an opportunity for travelers to undertake specialized travel to more extreme destinations in the security of an expeditionary group with medical coverage. Little is known about the illnesses and injuries occurring to expeditioners in Mongolia or access to dental care in the local population. This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of health problems suffered by travelers and managed among the local population on a research expedition to Mongolia. METHODS: In June 2005, the expedition physician (MTMS) and dentist (DD) prospectively diagnosed and recorded all illnesses and injuries among 16 travelers (eight males and eight females) as well as any indigenous people on a 22-day paleontological expedition to the Mongolian Gobi Desert. RESULTS: There were 53 health presentations and 14 dental problems among the indigenous population and the Mongolian escort. Males and females presented in equal proportions with the average age of 49 years (SD = 16). Presentations involved locomotor/accident (32%), dermatological (23%), gastrointestinal (19%), neurological (17%), psychological (6%), and with other systems (11%). Most accidents were due to lacerations (85%). Presentations were highest on days 4 and 5 (10% or 18%). Females were significantly more likely to present later in the expedition (p= 0.013). One quarter (25%) were handled conservatively with 28% requiring topical treatments with others requiring antiemetics (9%) and anti-inflammatory drugs (4%). There were no dental concerns reported among the expeditioners, although there were 14 cases among the indigenous population. While there were no deaths on the expedition, there were two major incidents, one of which required emergency evacuation. CONCLUSIONS: The health problems encountered were largely similar to those reported for other expeditions. The most common problems included trauma as well as dermatological, dental, gastrointestinal, and neurological conditions. It is important that expedition teams are prepared to manage common problems, such as trauma and dental lesions. SN - 1708-8305 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19796103/Illness_and_injury_to_travelers_and_access_to_dental_care_on_a_research_expedition_to_Mongolia_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2009.00319.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -