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Should triglycerides and the triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio be used as surrogates for insulin resistance?
Metabolism. 2010 Feb; 59(2):299-304.M

Abstract

The aims of the present study were to examine whether triglycerides (TG) and the triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-C) could predict insulin resistance in healthy African Americans and whites. This cross-sectional study included 99 African American and 50 white men and women between 18 and 45 years of age with body mass indexes between 18.5 and 38.0 kg/m(2). Anthropometric measures were obtained; and overnight fasting blood was collected for TG, HDL-C, glucose, and insulin. Insulin resistance was defined by fasting insulin concentration of at least 13.13 microU/mL and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) of at least 2.5. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to analyze the data. African Americans and whites had comparable demographic and anthropometric measures. Fasting insulin was higher in African Americans (12.4 +/- 7.8 microU/mL) than whites (10.2 +/- 7.5 microU/mL), but HOMA-IR did not differ significantly (African Americans, 2.9 +/- 2.0; whites, 2.4 +/- 1.9). Triglycerides and TG/HDL-C were significantly lower in African Americans (TG, 68.2 +/- 43.3 mg/dL; TG/HDL-C, 1.8 +/- 2.1) compared with whites (TG, 105.4 +/- 55.2 mg/dL; TG/HDL-C, 2.8 +/- 1.8). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves revealed that both TG and TG/HDL-C were acceptable markers of insulin resistance, as defined by fasting insulin concentration, in whites, 0.770 and 0.765, respectively, but poor predictors in African Americans, 0.633 and 0.651, respectively. Similarly, TG and TG/HDL-C were acceptable in predicting insulin resistance, as measured by HOMA-IR, in whites, 0.763 and 0.770, respectively, but poor in predicting HOMA-IR in African Americans, with areas of 0.625 and 0.639, respectively. In conclusion, the relationship between TG and TG/HDL-C with insulin resistance differs by ethnicity; and using TG and TG/HDL-C to predict insulin resistance in African Americans would not be appropriate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Military and Emergency Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA. sjkim@usuhs.milNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19796777

Citation

Kim-Dorner, Su-Jong, et al. "Should Triglycerides and the Triglycerides to High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Be Used as Surrogates for Insulin Resistance?" Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 59, no. 2, 2010, pp. 299-304.
Kim-Dorner SJ, Deuster PA, Zeno SA, et al. Should triglycerides and the triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio be used as surrogates for insulin resistance? Metabolism. 2010;59(2):299-304.
Kim-Dorner, S. J., Deuster, P. A., Zeno, S. A., Remaley, A. T., & Poth, M. (2010). Should triglycerides and the triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio be used as surrogates for insulin resistance? Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 59(2), 299-304. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2009.07.027
Kim-Dorner SJ, et al. Should Triglycerides and the Triglycerides to High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Be Used as Surrogates for Insulin Resistance. Metabolism. 2010;59(2):299-304. PubMed PMID: 19796777.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Should triglycerides and the triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio be used as surrogates for insulin resistance? AU - Kim-Dorner,Su-Jong, AU - Deuster,Patricia A, AU - Zeno,Stacey A, AU - Remaley,Alan T, AU - Poth,Merrily, Y1 - 2009/09/30/ PY - 2009/03/05/received PY - 2009/06/27/revised PY - 2009/07/28/accepted PY - 2009/10/3/entrez PY - 2009/10/3/pubmed PY - 2010/2/18/medline SP - 299 EP - 304 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metabolism VL - 59 IS - 2 N2 - The aims of the present study were to examine whether triglycerides (TG) and the triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-C) could predict insulin resistance in healthy African Americans and whites. This cross-sectional study included 99 African American and 50 white men and women between 18 and 45 years of age with body mass indexes between 18.5 and 38.0 kg/m(2). Anthropometric measures were obtained; and overnight fasting blood was collected for TG, HDL-C, glucose, and insulin. Insulin resistance was defined by fasting insulin concentration of at least 13.13 microU/mL and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) of at least 2.5. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to analyze the data. African Americans and whites had comparable demographic and anthropometric measures. Fasting insulin was higher in African Americans (12.4 +/- 7.8 microU/mL) than whites (10.2 +/- 7.5 microU/mL), but HOMA-IR did not differ significantly (African Americans, 2.9 +/- 2.0; whites, 2.4 +/- 1.9). Triglycerides and TG/HDL-C were significantly lower in African Americans (TG, 68.2 +/- 43.3 mg/dL; TG/HDL-C, 1.8 +/- 2.1) compared with whites (TG, 105.4 +/- 55.2 mg/dL; TG/HDL-C, 2.8 +/- 1.8). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curves revealed that both TG and TG/HDL-C were acceptable markers of insulin resistance, as defined by fasting insulin concentration, in whites, 0.770 and 0.765, respectively, but poor predictors in African Americans, 0.633 and 0.651, respectively. Similarly, TG and TG/HDL-C were acceptable in predicting insulin resistance, as measured by HOMA-IR, in whites, 0.763 and 0.770, respectively, but poor in predicting HOMA-IR in African Americans, with areas of 0.625 and 0.639, respectively. In conclusion, the relationship between TG and TG/HDL-C with insulin resistance differs by ethnicity; and using TG and TG/HDL-C to predict insulin resistance in African Americans would not be appropriate. SN - 1532-8600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19796777/Should_triglycerides_and_the_triglycerides_to_high_density_lipoprotein_cholesterol_ratio_be_used_as_surrogates_for_insulin_resistance L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(09)00318-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -