Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Intimate partner violence moderates the association between mother-infant adrenocortical activity across an emotional challenge.
J Fam Psychol. 2009 Oct; 23(5):615-25.JF

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between mother and infant adrenocortical levels and reactivity to an emotion eliciting task. The impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on these relationships was assessed as a moderator. The sample (n = 702 mother-infant dyads) was racially diverse and from predominantly low-income, rural communities. During a home visit, the dyad's saliva was sampled before, 20 min, and 40 min after standardized tasks designed to elicit the infant's emotional arousal and later assayed for cortisol. Mothers completed self-report measures of their partner's violence, and parenting behaviors were assessed via structured interview and mother-child interactions. In response to the task, infants had positive, and mothers had negative, cortisol slopes. Contrary to expectations, there were no IPV-related differences in mean pretask cortisol levels or reactivity in the mothers or infants. Mother-infant dyads from households characterized by either (1) violence or (2) restrictive and punitive parenting behaviors exhibited correlated cortisol reactivity measured in response to the infant challenge task. The findings suggest that social contextual features of the early caregiving environment may influence individual differences in the coordination between maternal and infant adrenocortical reactivity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. hibel@purdue.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19803598

Citation

Hibel, Leah C., et al. "Intimate Partner Violence Moderates the Association Between Mother-infant Adrenocortical Activity Across an Emotional Challenge." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 23, no. 5, 2009, pp. 615-25.
Hibel LC, Granger DA, Blair C, et al. Intimate partner violence moderates the association between mother-infant adrenocortical activity across an emotional challenge. J Fam Psychol. 2009;23(5):615-25.
Hibel, L. C., Granger, D. A., Blair, C., & Cox, M. J. (2009). Intimate partner violence moderates the association between mother-infant adrenocortical activity across an emotional challenge. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 23(5), 615-25. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0016323
Hibel LC, et al. Intimate Partner Violence Moderates the Association Between Mother-infant Adrenocortical Activity Across an Emotional Challenge. J Fam Psychol. 2009;23(5):615-25. PubMed PMID: 19803598.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate partner violence moderates the association between mother-infant adrenocortical activity across an emotional challenge. AU - Hibel,Leah C, AU - Granger,Douglas A, AU - Blair,Clancy, AU - Cox,Martha J, AU - ,, PY - 2009/10/7/entrez PY - 2009/10/7/pubmed PY - 2010/1/7/medline SP - 615 EP - 25 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - This study examined the relationship between mother and infant adrenocortical levels and reactivity to an emotion eliciting task. The impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) on these relationships was assessed as a moderator. The sample (n = 702 mother-infant dyads) was racially diverse and from predominantly low-income, rural communities. During a home visit, the dyad's saliva was sampled before, 20 min, and 40 min after standardized tasks designed to elicit the infant's emotional arousal and later assayed for cortisol. Mothers completed self-report measures of their partner's violence, and parenting behaviors were assessed via structured interview and mother-child interactions. In response to the task, infants had positive, and mothers had negative, cortisol slopes. Contrary to expectations, there were no IPV-related differences in mean pretask cortisol levels or reactivity in the mothers or infants. Mother-infant dyads from households characterized by either (1) violence or (2) restrictive and punitive parenting behaviors exhibited correlated cortisol reactivity measured in response to the infant challenge task. The findings suggest that social contextual features of the early caregiving environment may influence individual differences in the coordination between maternal and infant adrenocortical reactivity. SN - 1939-1293 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19803598/Intimate_partner_violence_moderates_the_association_between_mother_infant_adrenocortical_activity_across_an_emotional_challenge_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/fam/23/5/615 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -