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Antecedents and consequences of demand/withdraw.
J Fam Psychol. 2009 Oct; 23(5):749-57.JF

Abstract

The authors examined the immediate antecedents and consequences of the demand/withdraw interaction pattern within naturally occurring conflicts. Both partners in 75 couples, including gay, lesbian, and straight couples, were interviewed individually regarding 2 recent conflicts, 1 chosen by each partner, and completed postinterview questionnaires. Interviews were coded for antecedents (e.g., upset prior to conflict), consequences (e.g., resolution of conflict), and demand/withdraw behaviors. In the postinterview questionnaires, participants rated demand/withdraw behaviors and their satisfaction with the outcome of the discussion. Results demonstrated that demand/withdraw behavior shifts depending on whose issue is under discussion, but other proximal antecedents did not significantly predict demand/withdraw. Regarding consequences, results indicated that most conflicts do not result in resolution, and most resolutions do not involve agreed-on change. Demand/withdraw did not predict a decreased likelihood of resolution. However, for those issues that were resolved, demand/withdraw resulted in a decreased likelihood of changes being agreed on. Furthermore, demand/withdraw predicted less satisfaction with the outcome of the discussion, even when controlling for the substantive outcome. Results were generally replicated across both self-report and coder ratings of demand/withdraw.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, USA. mmcginn@ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19803610

Citation

McGinn, Meghan M., et al. "Antecedents and Consequences of Demand/withdraw." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 23, no. 5, 2009, pp. 749-57.
McGinn MM, McFarland PT, Christensen A. Antecedents and consequences of demand/withdraw. J Fam Psychol. 2009;23(5):749-57.
McGinn, M. M., McFarland, P. T., & Christensen, A. (2009). Antecedents and consequences of demand/withdraw. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 23(5), 749-57. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0016185
McGinn MM, McFarland PT, Christensen A. Antecedents and Consequences of Demand/withdraw. J Fam Psychol. 2009;23(5):749-57. PubMed PMID: 19803610.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antecedents and consequences of demand/withdraw. AU - McGinn,Meghan M, AU - McFarland,Pamela T, AU - Christensen,Andrew, PY - 2009/10/7/entrez PY - 2009/10/7/pubmed PY - 2010/1/7/medline SP - 749 EP - 57 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - The authors examined the immediate antecedents and consequences of the demand/withdraw interaction pattern within naturally occurring conflicts. Both partners in 75 couples, including gay, lesbian, and straight couples, were interviewed individually regarding 2 recent conflicts, 1 chosen by each partner, and completed postinterview questionnaires. Interviews were coded for antecedents (e.g., upset prior to conflict), consequences (e.g., resolution of conflict), and demand/withdraw behaviors. In the postinterview questionnaires, participants rated demand/withdraw behaviors and their satisfaction with the outcome of the discussion. Results demonstrated that demand/withdraw behavior shifts depending on whose issue is under discussion, but other proximal antecedents did not significantly predict demand/withdraw. Regarding consequences, results indicated that most conflicts do not result in resolution, and most resolutions do not involve agreed-on change. Demand/withdraw did not predict a decreased likelihood of resolution. However, for those issues that were resolved, demand/withdraw resulted in a decreased likelihood of changes being agreed on. Furthermore, demand/withdraw predicted less satisfaction with the outcome of the discussion, even when controlling for the substantive outcome. Results were generally replicated across both self-report and coder ratings of demand/withdraw. SN - 1939-1293 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19803610/Antecedents_and_consequences_of_demand/withdraw_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/fam/23/5/749 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -