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Blink rate during tests of executive performance after nocturnal traffic noise.
Noise Health. 2009 Oct-Dec; 11(45):217-22.NH

Abstract

This analysis is on the hypothesis that nocturnal traffic noise affects sleep quality whereas performance decrement is avoided by increased effort expressed by a decrease in blink rates (BRs) during a visual task. Twenty-four persons (12 women, 12 men; 19-28 years, 23.56+/-2.49 years) slept during three consecutive weeks in the laboratory while exposed to road, rail, or aircraft noise with weekly permuted changes. Each week consisted of a random sequence of a quiet night (32 dBA) and three nights with equivalent noise levels of 39, 44 and 50 dBA respectively. The polysomnogram was recorded during all nights. Every morning the participants rated their sleep quality and then completed two executive tasks (Go/Nogo-, Switch-task). Neither of the two performance tests was affected by nocturnal noise. Sleep efficiency and subjective sleep quality decreased with increasing noise levels but were not associated with the type of noise. In contrast, BRs were associated with the type of noise, not with noise levels. The results do not support the hypothesis concerning the BR. The possible reasons are discussed. However, the results do not exclude that other physiological parameters such as heart rate or brain potentials measured during the tests might have revealed alterations associated with nocturnal noise exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University Medical Centre of the Johannes-Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19805931

Citation

Breimhorst, Markus, et al. "Blink Rate During Tests of Executive Performance After Nocturnal Traffic Noise." Noise & Health, vol. 11, no. 45, 2009, pp. 217-22.
Breimhorst M, Marks A, Robens S, et al. Blink rate during tests of executive performance after nocturnal traffic noise. Noise Health. 2009;11(45):217-22.
Breimhorst, M., Marks, A., Robens, S., & Griefahn, B. (2009). Blink rate during tests of executive performance after nocturnal traffic noise. Noise & Health, 11(45), 217-22. https://doi.org/10.4103/1463-1741.56215
Breimhorst M, et al. Blink Rate During Tests of Executive Performance After Nocturnal Traffic Noise. Noise Health. 2009 Oct-Dec;11(45):217-22. PubMed PMID: 19805931.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Blink rate during tests of executive performance after nocturnal traffic noise. AU - Breimhorst,Markus, AU - Marks,Anke, AU - Robens,Sibylle, AU - Griefahn,Barbara, PY - 2009/10/7/entrez PY - 2009/10/7/pubmed PY - 2010/1/29/medline SP - 217 EP - 22 JF - Noise & health JO - Noise Health VL - 11 IS - 45 N2 - This analysis is on the hypothesis that nocturnal traffic noise affects sleep quality whereas performance decrement is avoided by increased effort expressed by a decrease in blink rates (BRs) during a visual task. Twenty-four persons (12 women, 12 men; 19-28 years, 23.56+/-2.49 years) slept during three consecutive weeks in the laboratory while exposed to road, rail, or aircraft noise with weekly permuted changes. Each week consisted of a random sequence of a quiet night (32 dBA) and three nights with equivalent noise levels of 39, 44 and 50 dBA respectively. The polysomnogram was recorded during all nights. Every morning the participants rated their sleep quality and then completed two executive tasks (Go/Nogo-, Switch-task). Neither of the two performance tests was affected by nocturnal noise. Sleep efficiency and subjective sleep quality decreased with increasing noise levels but were not associated with the type of noise. In contrast, BRs were associated with the type of noise, not with noise levels. The results do not support the hypothesis concerning the BR. The possible reasons are discussed. However, the results do not exclude that other physiological parameters such as heart rate or brain potentials measured during the tests might have revealed alterations associated with nocturnal noise exposure. SN - 1463-1741 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19805931/Blink_rate_during_tests_of_executive_performance_after_nocturnal_traffic_noise_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/sleepdisorders.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -