Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

In vitro bioaccessibility of beta-carotene from heat-processed orange-fleshed sweet potato.
J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Oct 28; 57(20):9693-8.JA

Abstract

Orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) is currently promoted in parts of sub-Saharan Africa as a biofortified staple food with large potential to provide considerable amounts of provitamin A carotenoids. However, the bioaccessibility of provitamin A carotenoids from OFSP has not been widely investigated, especially not as an effect of different preparation methods. In this study, we used an in vitro digestion model to assess the bioaccessibility of beta-carotene from differently heat-processed OFSP. The fraction of carotenoids transferred from the food matrix to a micellar phase obtained after microfiltration and to a supernatant obtained after low-speed centrifugation was investigated. The percentage of accessible all-trans-beta-carotene in the micellar phase varied between 0.5 and 1.1% in the heat-processed OFSP without fat and between 11 and 22% with the addition of 2.5% (w/w) cooking oil. In comparison with the micellar phase, the percentage of accessible all-trans-beta-carotene in the supernatant phase was significantly higher (P < 0.001), between 24 and 41% without fat and between 28 and 46% with fat. These results support the importance of fat for an improved micellarization of beta-carotene. Overall, the high in vitro bioaccessibility of beta-carotene from heat-processed OFSP indicates that sweet potato might be a promising dietary approach to combat vitamin A deficiency.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Food Science, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden. anton.bengtsson@chalmers.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19807125

Citation

Bengtsson, Anton, et al. "In Vitro Bioaccessibility of Beta-carotene From Heat-processed Orange-fleshed Sweet Potato." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 57, no. 20, 2009, pp. 9693-8.
Bengtsson A, Larsson Alminger M, Svanberg U. In vitro bioaccessibility of beta-carotene from heat-processed orange-fleshed sweet potato. J Agric Food Chem. 2009;57(20):9693-8.
Bengtsson, A., Larsson Alminger, M., & Svanberg, U. (2009). In vitro bioaccessibility of beta-carotene from heat-processed orange-fleshed sweet potato. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 57(20), 9693-8. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf901692r
Bengtsson A, Larsson Alminger M, Svanberg U. In Vitro Bioaccessibility of Beta-carotene From Heat-processed Orange-fleshed Sweet Potato. J Agric Food Chem. 2009 Oct 28;57(20):9693-8. PubMed PMID: 19807125.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro bioaccessibility of beta-carotene from heat-processed orange-fleshed sweet potato. AU - Bengtsson,Anton, AU - Larsson Alminger,Marie, AU - Svanberg,Ulf, PY - 2009/10/8/entrez PY - 2009/10/8/pubmed PY - 2010/10/5/medline SP - 9693 EP - 8 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 57 IS - 20 N2 - Orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) is currently promoted in parts of sub-Saharan Africa as a biofortified staple food with large potential to provide considerable amounts of provitamin A carotenoids. However, the bioaccessibility of provitamin A carotenoids from OFSP has not been widely investigated, especially not as an effect of different preparation methods. In this study, we used an in vitro digestion model to assess the bioaccessibility of beta-carotene from differently heat-processed OFSP. The fraction of carotenoids transferred from the food matrix to a micellar phase obtained after microfiltration and to a supernatant obtained after low-speed centrifugation was investigated. The percentage of accessible all-trans-beta-carotene in the micellar phase varied between 0.5 and 1.1% in the heat-processed OFSP without fat and between 11 and 22% with the addition of 2.5% (w/w) cooking oil. In comparison with the micellar phase, the percentage of accessible all-trans-beta-carotene in the supernatant phase was significantly higher (P < 0.001), between 24 and 41% without fat and between 28 and 46% with fat. These results support the importance of fat for an improved micellarization of beta-carotene. Overall, the high in vitro bioaccessibility of beta-carotene from heat-processed OFSP indicates that sweet potato might be a promising dietary approach to combat vitamin A deficiency. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19807125/In_vitro_bioaccessibility_of_beta_carotene_from_heat_processed_orange_fleshed_sweet_potato_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf901692r DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -