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The changing phenotype of academic nephrology -- a future at risk?
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 Dec; 4(12):2051-8.CJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Academic nephrology faces increasing challenges in faculty hiring and development. However, it is unknown how these pressures have affected the number and demographics of academic nephrologists.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS

Using the Association of American Medical Colleges Faculty Roster database, changes were analyzed in MD nephrology, as well as other internal medicine subspecialty, faculty from 1998 to 2008.

RESULTS

There were 1315 full-time MD nephrology faculty in 2008; this fell by 4.9% over the past decade. There were fewer junior, and more senior, faculty over this period. This was associated with 12.4% fewer tenured, 22.3% fewer tenure track, and an 11.5% increase in nontenure track, academic nephrologists. Academic nephrologists who are U.S. medical school graduates declined by 11.9%, while those who were international medical school graduates increased by 13.2%; nephrology has a greater percentage of international medical school graduates than any other internal medicine subspecialty. Female nephrology faculty increased by 14.3%, while male faculty fell by 9.5%. Asian nephrology faculty increased by 41.3%, while Caucasians declined by 15.2%. Similar changes in all the above parameters were seen for most other internal medicine subspecialties. The nephrology research programs at the top 20 research institutions, as compared with all other nephrology programs, had a greater decline in total MD, male, tenure track, and junior faculty.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that the future of academic nephrology is at risk. The decline in nephrology faculty provides incentive for leaders in academic nephrology to improve recruiting and retention practices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA. Donald.kohan@hsc.utah.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19808219

Citation

Kohan, Donald E., and Bradley C. Baird. "The Changing Phenotype of Academic Nephrology -- a Future at Risk?" Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, vol. 4, no. 12, 2009, pp. 2051-8.
Kohan DE, Baird BC. The changing phenotype of academic nephrology -- a future at risk? Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009;4(12):2051-8.
Kohan, D. E., & Baird, B. C. (2009). The changing phenotype of academic nephrology -- a future at risk? Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, 4(12), 2051-8. https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.05340709
Kohan DE, Baird BC. The Changing Phenotype of Academic Nephrology -- a Future at Risk. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009;4(12):2051-8. PubMed PMID: 19808219.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The changing phenotype of academic nephrology -- a future at risk? AU - Kohan,Donald E, AU - Baird,Bradley C, Y1 - 2009/10/01/ PY - 2009/10/8/entrez PY - 2009/10/8/pubmed PY - 2010/3/2/medline SP - 2051 EP - 8 JF - Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN JO - Clin J Am Soc Nephrol VL - 4 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Academic nephrology faces increasing challenges in faculty hiring and development. However, it is unknown how these pressures have affected the number and demographics of academic nephrologists. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Using the Association of American Medical Colleges Faculty Roster database, changes were analyzed in MD nephrology, as well as other internal medicine subspecialty, faculty from 1998 to 2008. RESULTS: There were 1315 full-time MD nephrology faculty in 2008; this fell by 4.9% over the past decade. There were fewer junior, and more senior, faculty over this period. This was associated with 12.4% fewer tenured, 22.3% fewer tenure track, and an 11.5% increase in nontenure track, academic nephrologists. Academic nephrologists who are U.S. medical school graduates declined by 11.9%, while those who were international medical school graduates increased by 13.2%; nephrology has a greater percentage of international medical school graduates than any other internal medicine subspecialty. Female nephrology faculty increased by 14.3%, while male faculty fell by 9.5%. Asian nephrology faculty increased by 41.3%, while Caucasians declined by 15.2%. Similar changes in all the above parameters were seen for most other internal medicine subspecialties. The nephrology research programs at the top 20 research institutions, as compared with all other nephrology programs, had a greater decline in total MD, male, tenure track, and junior faculty. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the future of academic nephrology is at risk. The decline in nephrology faculty provides incentive for leaders in academic nephrology to improve recruiting and retention practices. SN - 1555-905X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19808219/The_changing_phenotype_of_academic_nephrology____a_future_at_risk L2 - http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=19808219 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -