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Lack of advantage of high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate diets in dogs with stabilised diabetes.
J Small Anim Pract. 2009 Nov; 50(11):604-14.JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess the influence of high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate diets with two levels of dietary fat, compared with a commercial diet with moderate-fibre, low-carbohydrate and higher fat, on insulin requirement, glycaemic control and lipid profile of dogs with stabilised diabetes.

METHODS

Twelve dogs with spontaneous diabetes mellitus were studied. Glycaemic control was evaluated by plasma fructosamine, glycosylated haemoglobin and 48-hour serial blood glucose measurements. The insulin dosage required to maintain clinical stability was also determined. Lipid profiles comprised serial measurements of plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, free glycerol and free fatty acids. Data were analysed using analysis of variance.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences in insulin requirement or glycaemic control among diets. Weight loss occurred when the dogs were fed the high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-fat diet (P<0.002), whereas weight was maintained with the other two diets. The high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-fat diet resulted in lower mean plasma cholesterol compared with either of the higher-fat diets (P< or =0.003), and lower mean plasma triglyceride (P=0.060), free fatty acid (P<0.001) and free glycerol (P=0.015) than the commercial diet.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

For stable diabetic dogs, high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate diets offered no significant advantage compared with a commercial diet with moderate fibre and low carbohydrate. Diets with high fibre, moderate carbohydrate and moderate fat should not be routinely recommended for dogs with thin body condition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Companion Animal Health, School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19814767

Citation

Fleeman, L M., et al. "Lack of Advantage of High-fibre, Moderate-carbohydrate Diets in Dogs With Stabilised Diabetes." The Journal of Small Animal Practice, vol. 50, no. 11, 2009, pp. 604-14.
Fleeman LM, Rand JS, Markwell PJ. Lack of advantage of high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate diets in dogs with stabilised diabetes. J Small Anim Pract. 2009;50(11):604-14.
Fleeman, L. M., Rand, J. S., & Markwell, P. J. (2009). Lack of advantage of high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate diets in dogs with stabilised diabetes. The Journal of Small Animal Practice, 50(11), 604-14. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-5827.2009.00817.x
Fleeman LM, Rand JS, Markwell PJ. Lack of Advantage of High-fibre, Moderate-carbohydrate Diets in Dogs With Stabilised Diabetes. J Small Anim Pract. 2009;50(11):604-14. PubMed PMID: 19814767.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lack of advantage of high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate diets in dogs with stabilised diabetes. AU - Fleeman,L M, AU - Rand,J S, AU - Markwell,P J, Y1 - 2009/10/08/ PY - 2009/10/10/entrez PY - 2009/10/10/pubmed PY - 2010/1/5/medline SP - 604 EP - 14 JF - The Journal of small animal practice JO - J Small Anim Pract VL - 50 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate diets with two levels of dietary fat, compared with a commercial diet with moderate-fibre, low-carbohydrate and higher fat, on insulin requirement, glycaemic control and lipid profile of dogs with stabilised diabetes. METHODS: Twelve dogs with spontaneous diabetes mellitus were studied. Glycaemic control was evaluated by plasma fructosamine, glycosylated haemoglobin and 48-hour serial blood glucose measurements. The insulin dosage required to maintain clinical stability was also determined. Lipid profiles comprised serial measurements of plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, free glycerol and free fatty acids. Data were analysed using analysis of variance. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in insulin requirement or glycaemic control among diets. Weight loss occurred when the dogs were fed the high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-fat diet (P<0.002), whereas weight was maintained with the other two diets. The high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-fat diet resulted in lower mean plasma cholesterol compared with either of the higher-fat diets (P< or =0.003), and lower mean plasma triglyceride (P=0.060), free fatty acid (P<0.001) and free glycerol (P=0.015) than the commercial diet. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: For stable diabetic dogs, high-fibre, moderate-carbohydrate diets offered no significant advantage compared with a commercial diet with moderate fibre and low carbohydrate. Diets with high fibre, moderate carbohydrate and moderate fat should not be routinely recommended for dogs with thin body condition. SN - 1748-5827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19814767/Lack_of_advantage_of_high_fibre_moderate_carbohydrate_diets_in_dogs_with_stabilised_diabetes_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-5827.2009.00817.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -