Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Can asylum-seekers with posttraumatic stress disorder be successfully treated? A randomized controlled pilot study.
Cogn Behav Ther. 2010; 39(2):81-91.CB

Abstract

Rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are exceptionally high among asylum-seekers. Reportedly, stressors caused by the asylum procedure and psychological consequences of torture contribute to the maintenance of symptoms and interfere with treatment. In a pilot randomized controlled trial, the authors examined the efficacy of trauma-focused treatment in 32 asylum-seekers with PTSD resulting from state-sponsored violence and other traumatic events. Narrative exposure therapy (NET) was compared with treatment as usual (TAU), with a focus on stabilization and psychoactive medication. Six months after treatment, a significant reduction of posttraumatic stress symptoms was found in the NET participants but not in the TAU group. Although treatment gains were moderate, these results indicate that NET is a promising approach for the treatment of PTSD in asylum-seekers living in unstable conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Bielefeld University, Germany. frank.neuner@uni-bielefeld.de <frank.neuner@uni-bielefeld.de>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19816834

Citation

Neuner, Frank, et al. "Can Asylum-seekers With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Be Successfully Treated? a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study." Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, vol. 39, no. 2, 2010, pp. 81-91.
Neuner F, Kurreck S, Ruf M, et al. Can asylum-seekers with posttraumatic stress disorder be successfully treated? A randomized controlled pilot study. Cogn Behav Ther. 2010;39(2):81-91.
Neuner, F., Kurreck, S., Ruf, M., Odenwald, M., Elbert, T., & Schauer, M. (2010). Can asylum-seekers with posttraumatic stress disorder be successfully treated? A randomized controlled pilot study. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 39(2), 81-91. https://doi.org/10.1080/16506070903121042
Neuner F, et al. Can Asylum-seekers With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Be Successfully Treated? a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study. Cogn Behav Ther. 2010;39(2):81-91. PubMed PMID: 19816834.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Can asylum-seekers with posttraumatic stress disorder be successfully treated? A randomized controlled pilot study. AU - Neuner,Frank, AU - Kurreck,Silke, AU - Ruf,Martina, AU - Odenwald,Michael, AU - Elbert,Thomas, AU - Schauer,Maggie, PY - 2009/10/10/entrez PY - 2009/10/10/pubmed PY - 2010/8/5/medline SP - 81 EP - 91 JF - Cognitive behaviour therapy JO - Cogn Behav Ther VL - 39 IS - 2 N2 - Rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are exceptionally high among asylum-seekers. Reportedly, stressors caused by the asylum procedure and psychological consequences of torture contribute to the maintenance of symptoms and interfere with treatment. In a pilot randomized controlled trial, the authors examined the efficacy of trauma-focused treatment in 32 asylum-seekers with PTSD resulting from state-sponsored violence and other traumatic events. Narrative exposure therapy (NET) was compared with treatment as usual (TAU), with a focus on stabilization and psychoactive medication. Six months after treatment, a significant reduction of posttraumatic stress symptoms was found in the NET participants but not in the TAU group. Although treatment gains were moderate, these results indicate that NET is a promising approach for the treatment of PTSD in asylum-seekers living in unstable conditions. SN - 1651-2316 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19816834/Can_asylum_seekers_with_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_be_successfully_treated_A_randomized_controlled_pilot_study_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/16506070903121042 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -