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Alcohol drinking and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of the dose-risk relation.

Abstract

In order to provide a more precise quantification of the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk, we performed a meta-analysis of relevant dose-risk results. We conducted a PubMed search of all case-control (N=21) and cohort (N=11) studies published up to March 2009. We computed summary relative risk (RR) estimates using either fixed- or, in the presence of heterogeneity, random-effects models. The pooled RR was 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 0.86-0.97) for <3 drinks/day and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.12-1.34) for > or = 3 drinks/day. The increased risk for heavy drinking was similar in women and men, but apparently stronger in cohort studies (RR=1.29), in studies with high quality index (RR=1.30), and did not appear to be explained by residual confounding by either history of pancreatitis or tobacco smoking. This meta-analysis provides strong evidence for the absence of a role of moderate drinking in pancreatic carcinogenesis, coupled to an increased risk for heavy alcohol drinking. Given the moderate increase in risk and the low prevalence of heavy drinkers in most populations, alcohol appears to be responsible only for a small fraction of all pancreatic cancers.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, 20156, Milano, Italy. irene.tramacere@marionegri.it

    , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    International journal of cancer 126:6 2010 Mar 15 pg 1474-86

    MeSH

    Alcohol Drinking
    Case-Control Studies
    Cohort Studies
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Pancreatic Neoplasms
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19816941

    Citation

    Tramacere, Irene, et al. "Alcohol Drinking and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis of the Dose-risk Relation." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 126, no. 6, 2010, pp. 1474-86.
    Tramacere I, Scotti L, Jenab M, et al. Alcohol drinking and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of the dose-risk relation. Int J Cancer. 2010;126(6):1474-86.
    Tramacere, I., Scotti, L., Jenab, M., Bagnardi, V., Bellocco, R., Rota, M., ... La Vecchia, C. (2010). Alcohol drinking and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of the dose-risk relation. International Journal of Cancer, 126(6), pp. 1474-86. doi:10.1002/ijc.24936.
    Tramacere I, et al. Alcohol Drinking and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis of the Dose-risk Relation. Int J Cancer. 2010 Mar 15;126(6):1474-86. PubMed PMID: 19816941.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol drinking and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of the dose-risk relation. AU - Tramacere,Irene, AU - Scotti,Lorenza, AU - Jenab,Mazda, AU - Bagnardi,Vincenzo, AU - Bellocco,Rino, AU - Rota,Matteo, AU - Corrao,Giovanni, AU - Bravi,Francesca, AU - Boffetta,Paolo, AU - La Vecchia,Carlo, PY - 2009/10/10/entrez PY - 2009/10/10/pubmed PY - 2010/2/26/medline SP - 1474 EP - 86 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 126 IS - 6 N2 - In order to provide a more precise quantification of the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk, we performed a meta-analysis of relevant dose-risk results. We conducted a PubMed search of all case-control (N=21) and cohort (N=11) studies published up to March 2009. We computed summary relative risk (RR) estimates using either fixed- or, in the presence of heterogeneity, random-effects models. The pooled RR was 0.92 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 0.86-0.97) for <3 drinks/day and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.12-1.34) for > or = 3 drinks/day. The increased risk for heavy drinking was similar in women and men, but apparently stronger in cohort studies (RR=1.29), in studies with high quality index (RR=1.30), and did not appear to be explained by residual confounding by either history of pancreatitis or tobacco smoking. This meta-analysis provides strong evidence for the absence of a role of moderate drinking in pancreatic carcinogenesis, coupled to an increased risk for heavy alcohol drinking. Given the moderate increase in risk and the low prevalence of heavy drinkers in most populations, alcohol appears to be responsible only for a small fraction of all pancreatic cancers. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19816941/Alcohol_drinking_and_pancreatic_cancer_risk:_a_meta_analysis_of_the_dose_risk_relation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.24936 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -