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Respiratory syncytial virus, human bocavirus and rhinovirus bronchiolitis in infants.
Arch Dis Child. 2010 Jan; 95(1):35-41.AD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the prevalence of 14 viruses in infants with bronchiolitis and to study demographic and clinical differences in those with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus (hBoV) and rhinovirus (RV) infection.

METHODS

182 infants aged <12 months hospitalised for bronchiolitis were enrolled. Infants underwent nasal washing for the detection of RSV, influenza virus A and B, human coronavirus OC43, 229E, NL-63, HUK1, adenovirus, RV, parainfluenza 1-3, human metapneumovirus and hBoV. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were obtained from parents and from patient medical files. Main outcome measurements were age, breastfeeding history, family smoking habits, family history for asthma and atopy, blood eosinophil count, chest radiological findings, clinical severity score and number of days of hospitalisation.

RESULTS

A virus was detected in 57.2% of the 182 infants. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV (41.2%), hBoV (12.2%) and RV (8.8%). Infants with dual infections (RSV and hBoV) had a higher clinical severity score and more days of hospitalisation than infants with RSV, RV and hBoV bronchiolitis (mean+/-SD: 4.7+2.4 vs 4.3+/-2.4 vs 3.0+/-2.0 vs 2.9+/-1.7, p<0.05; and 6.0+/-3.2 vs 5.3+/-2.4 vs 4.0+/-1.6 vs 3.9+/-1.1 days; p<0.05). Infants with RV infection had higher blood eosinophil counts than infants with bronchiolitis from RSV and hBoV (307+/-436 vs 138+/-168 vs 89+/-19 n/mm(3); p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Although the major pathogen responsible for bronchiolitis remains RSV, the infection can also be caused by RV and hBoV. Demographic characteristics and clinical severity of the disease may depend on the number of viruses or on the specific virus detected.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00165 - Rome, Italy. midulla@uniroma1.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19822538

Citation

Midulla, F, et al. "Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human Bocavirus and Rhinovirus Bronchiolitis in Infants." Archives of Disease in Childhood, vol. 95, no. 1, 2010, pp. 35-41.
Midulla F, Scagnolari C, Bonci E, et al. Respiratory syncytial virus, human bocavirus and rhinovirus bronchiolitis in infants. Arch Dis Child. 2010;95(1):35-41.
Midulla, F., Scagnolari, C., Bonci, E., Pierangeli, A., Antonelli, G., De Angelis, D., Berardi, R., & Moretti, C. (2010). Respiratory syncytial virus, human bocavirus and rhinovirus bronchiolitis in infants. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 95(1), 35-41. https://doi.org/10.1136/adc.2008.153361
Midulla F, et al. Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human Bocavirus and Rhinovirus Bronchiolitis in Infants. Arch Dis Child. 2010;95(1):35-41. PubMed PMID: 19822538.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Respiratory syncytial virus, human bocavirus and rhinovirus bronchiolitis in infants. AU - Midulla,F, AU - Scagnolari,C, AU - Bonci,E, AU - Pierangeli,A, AU - Antonelli,G, AU - De Angelis,D, AU - Berardi,R, AU - Moretti,C, Y1 - 2009/10/11/ PY - 2009/10/14/entrez PY - 2009/10/14/pubmed PY - 2010/1/28/medline SP - 35 EP - 41 JF - Archives of disease in childhood JO - Arch Dis Child VL - 95 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of 14 viruses in infants with bronchiolitis and to study demographic and clinical differences in those with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus (hBoV) and rhinovirus (RV) infection. METHODS: 182 infants aged <12 months hospitalised for bronchiolitis were enrolled. Infants underwent nasal washing for the detection of RSV, influenza virus A and B, human coronavirus OC43, 229E, NL-63, HUK1, adenovirus, RV, parainfluenza 1-3, human metapneumovirus and hBoV. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were obtained from parents and from patient medical files. Main outcome measurements were age, breastfeeding history, family smoking habits, family history for asthma and atopy, blood eosinophil count, chest radiological findings, clinical severity score and number of days of hospitalisation. RESULTS: A virus was detected in 57.2% of the 182 infants. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV (41.2%), hBoV (12.2%) and RV (8.8%). Infants with dual infections (RSV and hBoV) had a higher clinical severity score and more days of hospitalisation than infants with RSV, RV and hBoV bronchiolitis (mean+/-SD: 4.7+2.4 vs 4.3+/-2.4 vs 3.0+/-2.0 vs 2.9+/-1.7, p<0.05; and 6.0+/-3.2 vs 5.3+/-2.4 vs 4.0+/-1.6 vs 3.9+/-1.1 days; p<0.05). Infants with RV infection had higher blood eosinophil counts than infants with bronchiolitis from RSV and hBoV (307+/-436 vs 138+/-168 vs 89+/-19 n/mm(3); p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Although the major pathogen responsible for bronchiolitis remains RSV, the infection can also be caused by RV and hBoV. Demographic characteristics and clinical severity of the disease may depend on the number of viruses or on the specific virus detected. SN - 1468-2044 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19822538/Respiratory_syncytial_virus_human_bocavirus_and_rhinovirus_bronchiolitis_in_infants_ L2 - https://adc.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=19822538 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -