Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Epidemiology of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury.
Semin Liver Dis 2009; 29(4):337-47SL

Abstract

Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant health problem because of its unpredictable nature, poorly understood pathogenesis, and potential to cause fatal outcomes. It is also a significant hurdle for drug development and marketing of safe prescription medications. Idiosyncratic DILI is generally rare, but its occurrence is likely underappreciated due to the lack of active reporting or surveillance systems and substantial challenges involved in its recognition and diagnosis. Nonetheless, DILI is a common cause of potentially serious and fatal acute liver failure in both children and adults. Population-based studies that accurately estimate the incidence and full spectrum of DILI are limited. However, using a prospective, population-based French study with an annual estimated incidence of 13.9 +/- 2.4 DILI cases per 100,000 inhabitants, it has been extrapolated that nearly 44,000 individuals in the United States will suffer from DILI each year. Although increasing numbers of patients are also being seen with DILI due to herbal and dietary supplements, the epidemiology of this entity requires further investigation. In this article, the epidemiology of DILI, both in the general population and in potentially high-risk subgroups, is reviewed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Divisions of Gastroenterology/Hepatology and Clinical Pharmacology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19826967

Citation

Bell, Lauren N., and Naga Chalasani. "Epidemiology of Idiosyncratic Drug-induced Liver Injury." Seminars in Liver Disease, vol. 29, no. 4, 2009, pp. 337-47.
Bell LN, Chalasani N. Epidemiology of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. Semin Liver Dis. 2009;29(4):337-47.
Bell, L. N., & Chalasani, N. (2009). Epidemiology of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. Seminars in Liver Disease, 29(4), pp. 337-47. doi:10.1055/s-0029-1240002.
Bell LN, Chalasani N. Epidemiology of Idiosyncratic Drug-induced Liver Injury. Semin Liver Dis. 2009;29(4):337-47. PubMed PMID: 19826967.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. AU - Bell,Lauren N, AU - Chalasani,Naga, Y1 - 2009/10/13/ PY - 2009/10/15/entrez PY - 2009/10/15/pubmed PY - 2009/12/18/medline SP - 337 EP - 47 JF - Seminars in liver disease JO - Semin. Liver Dis. VL - 29 IS - 4 N2 - Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant health problem because of its unpredictable nature, poorly understood pathogenesis, and potential to cause fatal outcomes. It is also a significant hurdle for drug development and marketing of safe prescription medications. Idiosyncratic DILI is generally rare, but its occurrence is likely underappreciated due to the lack of active reporting or surveillance systems and substantial challenges involved in its recognition and diagnosis. Nonetheless, DILI is a common cause of potentially serious and fatal acute liver failure in both children and adults. Population-based studies that accurately estimate the incidence and full spectrum of DILI are limited. However, using a prospective, population-based French study with an annual estimated incidence of 13.9 +/- 2.4 DILI cases per 100,000 inhabitants, it has been extrapolated that nearly 44,000 individuals in the United States will suffer from DILI each year. Although increasing numbers of patients are also being seen with DILI due to herbal and dietary supplements, the epidemiology of this entity requires further investigation. In this article, the epidemiology of DILI, both in the general population and in potentially high-risk subgroups, is reviewed. SN - 1098-8971 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19826967/Epidemiology_of_idiosyncratic_drug_induced_liver_injury_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0029-1240002 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -