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A study of neutrophil as a morphological marker of death from hemorrhagic shock in forensic practice cases.
Leg Med (Tokyo). 2009 Nov; 11(6):272-7.LM

Abstract

Excessive autolytic inflammation accompanied by dysfunction of "shock organs" is recognized as arising from hemorrhagic shock due to the promotion of endovascular recruitment of neutrophils. Here, activated neutrophils in the organs of autopsy cases were evaluated as a marker of death from hemorrhagic shock. Morphologically-determined injury to the heart, lung, liver, and kidney was investigated in death from five major causes: hemorrhagic shock, head injury, exsanguination, asphyxia, and drowning. The frequency of activated neutrophils was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. When the antemortem interval was less than 2h, it was found that neither morphological damage nor neutrophil frequencies were significantly different after death due to any of these 5 causes. In contrast, at longer antemortem intervals up to 8h, the frequency of neutrophils in hemorrhagic shock was significantly greater than in head injury, whereas the degree of morphological damage was no different. Thus, the appearance of activated neutrophils in the primary organs could be useful to identify death caused by hemorrhagic shock after longer antemortem intervals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan. h-sato@med.uoeh-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19828355

Citation

Sato, Hiroaki, et al. "A Study of Neutrophil as a Morphological Marker of Death From Hemorrhagic Shock in Forensic Practice Cases." Legal Medicine (Tokyo, Japan), vol. 11, no. 6, 2009, pp. 272-7.
Sato H, Kita T, Tanaka T, et al. A study of neutrophil as a morphological marker of death from hemorrhagic shock in forensic practice cases. Leg Med (Tokyo). 2009;11(6):272-7.
Sato, H., Kita, T., Tanaka, T., Kasai, K., & Tanaka, N. (2009). A study of neutrophil as a morphological marker of death from hemorrhagic shock in forensic practice cases. Legal Medicine (Tokyo, Japan), 11(6), 272-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.legalmed.2009.08.004
Sato H, et al. A Study of Neutrophil as a Morphological Marker of Death From Hemorrhagic Shock in Forensic Practice Cases. Leg Med (Tokyo). 2009;11(6):272-7. PubMed PMID: 19828355.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A study of neutrophil as a morphological marker of death from hemorrhagic shock in forensic practice cases. AU - Sato,Hiroaki, AU - Kita,Toshiro, AU - Tanaka,Toshiko, AU - Kasai,Kentaro, AU - Tanaka,Noriyuki, Y1 - 2009/10/13/ PY - 2009/06/01/received PY - 2009/08/20/revised PY - 2009/08/21/accepted PY - 2009/10/16/entrez PY - 2009/10/16/pubmed PY - 2010/2/13/medline SP - 272 EP - 7 JF - Legal medicine (Tokyo, Japan) JO - Leg Med (Tokyo) VL - 11 IS - 6 N2 - Excessive autolytic inflammation accompanied by dysfunction of "shock organs" is recognized as arising from hemorrhagic shock due to the promotion of endovascular recruitment of neutrophils. Here, activated neutrophils in the organs of autopsy cases were evaluated as a marker of death from hemorrhagic shock. Morphologically-determined injury to the heart, lung, liver, and kidney was investigated in death from five major causes: hemorrhagic shock, head injury, exsanguination, asphyxia, and drowning. The frequency of activated neutrophils was assessed by immunohistochemical staining. When the antemortem interval was less than 2h, it was found that neither morphological damage nor neutrophil frequencies were significantly different after death due to any of these 5 causes. In contrast, at longer antemortem intervals up to 8h, the frequency of neutrophils in hemorrhagic shock was significantly greater than in head injury, whereas the degree of morphological damage was no different. Thus, the appearance of activated neutrophils in the primary organs could be useful to identify death caused by hemorrhagic shock after longer antemortem intervals. SN - 1873-4162 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19828355/A_study_of_neutrophil_as_a_morphological_marker_of_death_from_hemorrhagic_shock_in_forensic_practice_cases_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1344-6223(09)00324-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -