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Mediterranean-style dietary pattern, reduced risk of metabolic syndrome traits, and incidence in the Framingham Offspring Cohort.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The benefit of the Mediterranean-style dietary pattern in mitigating metabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease has not been well investigated among nondiabetic Americans.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to examine the prospective association between the Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and metabolic syndrome.

DESIGN

The Mediterranean-style dietary pattern score (MSDPS) was used to characterize a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort. We examined the longitudinal association between MSDPS and metabolic syndrome traits (including homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, fasting glucose, waist circumference, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure) among 2730 participants of the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort without type 2 diabetes (baseline median age: 54 y; 55% women), who were followed from the fifth (baseline) to the seventh study examinations (mean follow-up time: 7 y), and metabolic syndrome incidence (according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition) in 1918 participants free of the condition at baseline.

RESULTS

A higher MSDPS was associated with lower homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (P = 0.02), waist circumference (P < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (P = 0.03), and triglycerides (P < 0.001) and higher HDL cholesterol (P = 0.02) after adjustment for the corresponding baseline values and for several confounding factors associated with type 2 diabetes risk. Participants in the highest quintile category of the MSDPS had a lower incidence of metabolic syndrome than those in the lowest quintile category (38.5% compared with 30.1%; P = 0.01).

CONCLUSION

Our study suggests that the consumption of a diet consistent with the principles of the Mediterranean-style diet may protect against metabolic syndrome in Americans.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA 02111-1524, USA.

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Cohort Studies
    Diet, Mediterranean
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Insulin Resistance
    Male
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Middle Aged
    Prospective Studies
    Risk

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19828705

    Citation

    Rumawas, Marcella E., et al. "Mediterranean-style Dietary Pattern, Reduced Risk of Metabolic Syndrome Traits, and Incidence in the Framingham Offspring Cohort." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 90, no. 6, 2009, pp. 1608-14.
    Rumawas ME, Meigs JB, Dwyer JT, et al. Mediterranean-style dietary pattern, reduced risk of metabolic syndrome traits, and incidence in the Framingham Offspring Cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(6):1608-14.
    Rumawas, M. E., Meigs, J. B., Dwyer, J. T., McKeown, N. M., & Jacques, P. F. (2009). Mediterranean-style dietary pattern, reduced risk of metabolic syndrome traits, and incidence in the Framingham Offspring Cohort. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 90(6), pp. 1608-14. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.27908.
    Rumawas ME, et al. Mediterranean-style Dietary Pattern, Reduced Risk of Metabolic Syndrome Traits, and Incidence in the Framingham Offspring Cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(6):1608-14. PubMed PMID: 19828705.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Mediterranean-style dietary pattern, reduced risk of metabolic syndrome traits, and incidence in the Framingham Offspring Cohort. AU - Rumawas,Marcella E, AU - Meigs,James B, AU - Dwyer,Johanna T, AU - McKeown,Nicola M, AU - Jacques,Paul F, Y1 - 2009/10/14/ PY - 2009/10/16/entrez PY - 2009/10/16/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 1608 EP - 14 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 90 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The benefit of the Mediterranean-style dietary pattern in mitigating metabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease has not been well investigated among nondiabetic Americans. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the prospective association between the Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and metabolic syndrome. DESIGN: The Mediterranean-style dietary pattern score (MSDPS) was used to characterize a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort. We examined the longitudinal association between MSDPS and metabolic syndrome traits (including homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, fasting glucose, waist circumference, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure) among 2730 participants of the Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort without type 2 diabetes (baseline median age: 54 y; 55% women), who were followed from the fifth (baseline) to the seventh study examinations (mean follow-up time: 7 y), and metabolic syndrome incidence (according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition) in 1918 participants free of the condition at baseline. RESULTS: A higher MSDPS was associated with lower homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (P = 0.02), waist circumference (P < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (P = 0.03), and triglycerides (P < 0.001) and higher HDL cholesterol (P = 0.02) after adjustment for the corresponding baseline values and for several confounding factors associated with type 2 diabetes risk. Participants in the highest quintile category of the MSDPS had a lower incidence of metabolic syndrome than those in the lowest quintile category (38.5% compared with 30.1%; P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that the consumption of a diet consistent with the principles of the Mediterranean-style diet may protect against metabolic syndrome in Americans. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19828705/Mediterranean_style_dietary_pattern_reduced_risk_of_metabolic_syndrome_traits_and_incidence_in_the_Framingham_Offspring_Cohort_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.2009.27908 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -