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Cigarette smoking and cognitive impairment: a 10-year cohort study in Taiwan.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2010 Sep-Oct; 51(2):143-8.AG

Abstract

The relationship between cigarette smoking and cognitive impairment is not a simple one. Some studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoking is a risk factor for cognitive impairment in the elderly, whereas other studies have shown cigarette smoking to be protective against dementia. This study aims to explore the relationship between cigarette smoking and cognitive impairment in elderly persons without dementia, during a 10-year period. Data were derived from a population-based cohort study of 1436 elderly Taiwanese. Cognitive function was measured by the SPMSQ both in 1993 and in 2003. A total of 1436 participants free of cognitive impairment at baseline (SPMSQ> or =6 in 1993) were included in these analyses. Subsequently, participants were divided into three groups: never, past, and current smokers. The effect of cigarette smoking on cognitive function was assessed using logistic regression. In the logistic regression model adjusted for age, education, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke at baseline, persons who had quit smoking (Odds ratio=OR=0.31; 95% CI=0.18-0.53; p<0.001) and those who continued to smoke (OR=0.37; 95% CI=0.20-0.70; p<0.001) were about one-third as likely to develop cognitive impairment as were those who never smoked. However, no dose-response relationship was observed between pack-years and cognitive impairment. Past and current smokers were less likely to develop cognitive impairment during a 10-year follow-up than were those who had never smoked. The present study suggests that smoking may be protective for cognitive function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Nursing, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung 402, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19833398

Citation

Wang, Cheng-Ching, et al. "Cigarette Smoking and Cognitive Impairment: a 10-year Cohort Study in Taiwan." Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, vol. 51, no. 2, 2010, pp. 143-8.
Wang CC, Lu TH, Liao WC, et al. Cigarette smoking and cognitive impairment: a 10-year cohort study in Taiwan. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2010;51(2):143-8.
Wang, C. C., Lu, T. H., Liao, W. C., Yuan, S. C., Kuo, P. C., Chuang, H. L., Lee, M. C., & Yen, C. H. (2010). Cigarette smoking and cognitive impairment: a 10-year cohort study in Taiwan. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 51(2), 143-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2009.09.041
Wang CC, et al. Cigarette Smoking and Cognitive Impairment: a 10-year Cohort Study in Taiwan. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2010 Sep-Oct;51(2):143-8. PubMed PMID: 19833398.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cigarette smoking and cognitive impairment: a 10-year cohort study in Taiwan. AU - Wang,Cheng-Ching, AU - Lu,Tsung-Hsueh, AU - Liao,Wen-Chun, AU - Yuan,Su-Chuan, AU - Kuo,Pi-Chao, AU - Chuang,Hsiao-Ling, AU - Lee,Meng-Chih, AU - Yen,Chi-Hua, Y1 - 2009/10/14/ PY - 2009/06/19/received PY - 2009/09/08/revised PY - 2009/09/11/accepted PY - 2009/10/17/entrez PY - 2009/10/17/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 143 EP - 8 JF - Archives of gerontology and geriatrics JO - Arch Gerontol Geriatr VL - 51 IS - 2 N2 - The relationship between cigarette smoking and cognitive impairment is not a simple one. Some studies have demonstrated that cigarette smoking is a risk factor for cognitive impairment in the elderly, whereas other studies have shown cigarette smoking to be protective against dementia. This study aims to explore the relationship between cigarette smoking and cognitive impairment in elderly persons without dementia, during a 10-year period. Data were derived from a population-based cohort study of 1436 elderly Taiwanese. Cognitive function was measured by the SPMSQ both in 1993 and in 2003. A total of 1436 participants free of cognitive impairment at baseline (SPMSQ> or =6 in 1993) were included in these analyses. Subsequently, participants were divided into three groups: never, past, and current smokers. The effect of cigarette smoking on cognitive function was assessed using logistic regression. In the logistic regression model adjusted for age, education, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke at baseline, persons who had quit smoking (Odds ratio=OR=0.31; 95% CI=0.18-0.53; p<0.001) and those who continued to smoke (OR=0.37; 95% CI=0.20-0.70; p<0.001) were about one-third as likely to develop cognitive impairment as were those who never smoked. However, no dose-response relationship was observed between pack-years and cognitive impairment. Past and current smokers were less likely to develop cognitive impairment during a 10-year follow-up than were those who had never smoked. The present study suggests that smoking may be protective for cognitive function. SN - 1872-6976 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19833398/Cigarette_smoking_and_cognitive_impairment:_a_10_year_cohort_study_in_Taiwan_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-4943(09)00241-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -