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Anthropometric measures of obesity and risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromso study.
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2010; 30(1):121-7AT

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of various obesity measures on identification of subjects at risk and their respective risk estimates for VTE in a prospective population-based study.

METHODS AND RESULTS

Measures of body composition such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were registered in 6708 subjects aged 25 to 84 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study (1994-1995). Incident VTE-events were registered during follow-up until September 1, 2007. There were 222 VTE-events during a median of 12.3 years of follow-up. All measures of obesity exhibited significantly increased HR for VTE in multivariable models with highest risk estimates for WC in both genders. The risk of VTE increased across quartiles of BMI, WC, and HC in both genders, but not for WHR. WC identified more subjects at risk using established criteria for obesity. WC had the highest area under the curve in both genders in ROC analysis, and WC above ROC-derived cut-off values (WC > or =85 cm in women and > or =95 cm in men) were associated with HRs of 1.92 (95% CI: 1.05 to 3.48) in women and 2.78 (95% CI: 1.47 to 5.27) in men.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings indicate that WC is the preferable anthropometric measure of obesity to identify subjects at risk and to predict risk of VTE.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Atherothrombotic Research in Tromsø, Department of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. knut.borch@fagmed.uit.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19834110

Citation

Borch, Knut H., et al. "Anthropometric Measures of Obesity and Risk of Venous Thromboembolism: the Tromso Study." Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 30, no. 1, 2010, pp. 121-7.
Borch KH, Braekkan SK, Mathiesen EB, et al. Anthropometric measures of obesity and risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromso study. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010;30(1):121-7.
Borch, K. H., Braekkan, S. K., Mathiesen, E. B., Njølstad, I., Wilsgaard, T., Størmer, J., & Hansen, J. B. (2010). Anthropometric measures of obesity and risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromso study. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 30(1), pp. 121-7. doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.109.188920.
Borch KH, et al. Anthropometric Measures of Obesity and Risk of Venous Thromboembolism: the Tromso Study. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010;30(1):121-7. PubMed PMID: 19834110.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anthropometric measures of obesity and risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromso study. AU - Borch,Knut H, AU - Braekkan,Sigrid K, AU - Mathiesen,Ellisiv B, AU - Njølstad,Inger, AU - Wilsgaard,Tom, AU - Størmer,Jan, AU - Hansen,John-Bjarne, Y1 - 2009/10/15/ PY - 2009/10/17/entrez PY - 2009/10/17/pubmed PY - 2010/1/15/medline SP - 121 EP - 7 JF - Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology JO - Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. VL - 30 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of various obesity measures on identification of subjects at risk and their respective risk estimates for VTE in a prospective population-based study. METHODS AND RESULTS: Measures of body composition such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were registered in 6708 subjects aged 25 to 84 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study (1994-1995). Incident VTE-events were registered during follow-up until September 1, 2007. There were 222 VTE-events during a median of 12.3 years of follow-up. All measures of obesity exhibited significantly increased HR for VTE in multivariable models with highest risk estimates for WC in both genders. The risk of VTE increased across quartiles of BMI, WC, and HC in both genders, but not for WHR. WC identified more subjects at risk using established criteria for obesity. WC had the highest area under the curve in both genders in ROC analysis, and WC above ROC-derived cut-off values (WC > or =85 cm in women and > or =95 cm in men) were associated with HRs of 1.92 (95% CI: 1.05 to 3.48) in women and 2.78 (95% CI: 1.47 to 5.27) in men. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that WC is the preferable anthropometric measure of obesity to identify subjects at risk and to predict risk of VTE. SN - 1524-4636 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19834110/Anthropometric_measures_of_obesity_and_risk_of_venous_thromboembolism:_the_Tromso_study_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/ATVBAHA.109.188920?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -