Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cannabis and crime: findings from a longitudinal study.

Abstract

AIM

To examine the association between cannabis use during adolescence and young adulthood, and subsequent criminal charges.

METHODS

Data were obtained from the Young in Norway Longitudinal Study. A population-based sample (n = 1353) was followed from 13 to 27 years of age. Data were gathered on cannabis use, alcohol consumption and alcohol problems, and use of other illegal substances such as amphetamines, cocaine and opiates. In addition, extensive information on socio-demographic, family and personal factors was collected. This data set was linked to individual-level information from official Norwegian crime statistics.

FINDINGS

We found robust associations between cannabis use and later registered criminal charges, both in adolescence and in young adulthood. These associations were adjusted for a range of confounding factors, such as family socio-economic background, parental support and monitoring, educational achievement and career, previous criminal charges, conduct problems and history of cohabitation and marriage. In separate models, we controlled for alcohol measures and for use of other illegal substances. After adjustment, we still found strong associations between cannabis use and later criminal charges. However, when eliminating all types of drug-specific charges from our models, we no longer observed any significant association with cannabis use.

CONCLUSIONS

The study suggests that cannabis use in adolescence and early adulthood may be associated with subsequent involvement in criminal activity. However, the bulk of this involvement seems to be related to various types of drug-specific crime. Thus, the association seems to rest on the fact that use, possession and distribution of drugs such as cannabis is illegal. The study strengthens concerns about the laws relating to the use, possession and distribution of cannabis.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo and Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway. willy.pedersen@sosiologi.uio.no

    Source

    Addiction (Abingdon, England) 105:1 2010 Jan pg 109-18

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adolescent Behavior
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Alcohol Drinking
    Crime
    Drug and Narcotic Control
    Epidemiologic Methods
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Marijuana Abuse
    Norway
    Risk Factors
    Social Adjustment
    Socioeconomic Factors
    Student Dropouts
    Substance-Related Disorders
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    19839964

    Citation

    * When formatting your citation, note that all book, journal, and database titles should be italicized* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabis and crime: findings from a longitudinal study. AU - Pedersen,Willy, AU - Skardhamar,Torbjørn, Y1 - 2009/10/15/ PY - 2009/10/21/entrez PY - 2009/10/21/pubmed PY - 2010/5/15/medline SP - 109 EP - 18 JF - Addiction (Abingdon, England) JO - Addiction VL - 105 IS - 1 N2 - AIM: To examine the association between cannabis use during adolescence and young adulthood, and subsequent criminal charges. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Young in Norway Longitudinal Study. A population-based sample (n = 1353) was followed from 13 to 27 years of age. Data were gathered on cannabis use, alcohol consumption and alcohol problems, and use of other illegal substances such as amphetamines, cocaine and opiates. In addition, extensive information on socio-demographic, family and personal factors was collected. This data set was linked to individual-level information from official Norwegian crime statistics. FINDINGS: We found robust associations between cannabis use and later registered criminal charges, both in adolescence and in young adulthood. These associations were adjusted for a range of confounding factors, such as family socio-economic background, parental support and monitoring, educational achievement and career, previous criminal charges, conduct problems and history of cohabitation and marriage. In separate models, we controlled for alcohol measures and for use of other illegal substances. After adjustment, we still found strong associations between cannabis use and later criminal charges. However, when eliminating all types of drug-specific charges from our models, we no longer observed any significant association with cannabis use. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that cannabis use in adolescence and early adulthood may be associated with subsequent involvement in criminal activity. However, the bulk of this involvement seems to be related to various types of drug-specific crime. Thus, the association seems to rest on the fact that use, possession and distribution of drugs such as cannabis is illegal. The study strengthens concerns about the laws relating to the use, possession and distribution of cannabis. SN - 1360-0443 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19839964/full_citation/Cannabis_and_crime:_findings_from_a_longitudinal_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2009.02719.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -