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PTSD, depression, and their comorbidity in relation to suicidality: cross-sectional and prospective analyses of a national probability sample of women.
Depress Anxiety. 2009; 26(12):1151-7.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A growing body of literature implicates major depressive disorder (MDD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as risk factors for suicidal ideation (SI) and suicide attempts (SA), though research has not adequately examined their differential contributions to increasing suicide risk prospectively or cross-sectionally.

METHODS

The contribution of these disorders and their comorbidity to SI and SA was examined using a national household probability sample of women (N=3,085) and covarying for trauma history, substance abuse, and demographic variables.

RESULTS

Cross-sectional analyses indicated that lifetime comorbidity of MDD and PTSD were associated with much higher prevalence of SI than either diagnosis alone; prevalence of SI was elevated and comparable for PTSD and MDD only. Comorbid diagnosis and PTSD only groups displayed greater prevalence of SA than those with MDD only. Lastly, a 2-year prospective analysis indicated that PTSD only at baseline was predictive of greater subsequent SI risk than MDD only, though comorbid diagnosis did not differ from either PTSD only or MDD only.

CONCLUSIONS

PTSD appears to be a particularly strong predictor of SI and SA. Overall, only 16% of women with lifetime SA did not have a history of MDD or PTSD, highlighting the importance of assessing these variables when assessing suicide risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA. cougle@psy.fsu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19842171

Citation

Cougle, Jesse R., et al. "PTSD, Depression, and Their Comorbidity in Relation to Suicidality: Cross-sectional and Prospective Analyses of a National Probability Sample of Women." Depression and Anxiety, vol. 26, no. 12, 2009, pp. 1151-7.
Cougle JR, Resnick H, Kilpatrick DG. PTSD, depression, and their comorbidity in relation to suicidality: cross-sectional and prospective analyses of a national probability sample of women. Depress Anxiety. 2009;26(12):1151-7.
Cougle, J. R., Resnick, H., & Kilpatrick, D. G. (2009). PTSD, depression, and their comorbidity in relation to suicidality: cross-sectional and prospective analyses of a national probability sample of women. Depression and Anxiety, 26(12), 1151-7. https://doi.org/10.1002/da.20621
Cougle JR, Resnick H, Kilpatrick DG. PTSD, Depression, and Their Comorbidity in Relation to Suicidality: Cross-sectional and Prospective Analyses of a National Probability Sample of Women. Depress Anxiety. 2009;26(12):1151-7. PubMed PMID: 19842171.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - PTSD, depression, and their comorbidity in relation to suicidality: cross-sectional and prospective analyses of a national probability sample of women. AU - Cougle,Jesse R, AU - Resnick,Heidi, AU - Kilpatrick,Dean G, PY - 2009/10/21/entrez PY - 2009/10/21/pubmed PY - 2010/3/2/medline SP - 1151 EP - 7 JF - Depression and anxiety JO - Depress Anxiety VL - 26 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: A growing body of literature implicates major depressive disorder (MDD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as risk factors for suicidal ideation (SI) and suicide attempts (SA), though research has not adequately examined their differential contributions to increasing suicide risk prospectively or cross-sectionally. METHODS: The contribution of these disorders and their comorbidity to SI and SA was examined using a national household probability sample of women (N=3,085) and covarying for trauma history, substance abuse, and demographic variables. RESULTS: Cross-sectional analyses indicated that lifetime comorbidity of MDD and PTSD were associated with much higher prevalence of SI than either diagnosis alone; prevalence of SI was elevated and comparable for PTSD and MDD only. Comorbid diagnosis and PTSD only groups displayed greater prevalence of SA than those with MDD only. Lastly, a 2-year prospective analysis indicated that PTSD only at baseline was predictive of greater subsequent SI risk than MDD only, though comorbid diagnosis did not differ from either PTSD only or MDD only. CONCLUSIONS: PTSD appears to be a particularly strong predictor of SI and SA. Overall, only 16% of women with lifetime SA did not have a history of MDD or PTSD, highlighting the importance of assessing these variables when assessing suicide risk. SN - 1520-6394 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19842171/PTSD_depression_and_their_comorbidity_in_relation_to_suicidality:_cross_sectional_and_prospective_analyses_of_a_national_probability_sample_of_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/da.20621 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -