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Penetration of azithromycin in experimental pleural empyema fluid.
Eur J Pharmacol 2010; 626(2-3):271-5EJ

Abstract

There were no data about the extent of azithromycin penetration into the empyemic pleural fluid in humans and in experimental animals. An empyema was created via the intrapleural injection of an Escherichia coli solution into the pleural space of New Zealand white rabbits. After an empyema was verified by thoracocentesis, 24h post inoculation, azithromycin (15 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. Antibiotic levels were determined in samples of pleural fluid and blood serum, collected serially at 2, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h, after administration. Azithromycin levels were estimated using an HPLC analytical method with fluorimetric detection. Azithromycin penetrated well into the empyemic pleural fluid, exhibiting a slower onset and decline compared to the corresponding blood serum levels. Equilibration between pleural fluid and blood serum compartments seemed to occur at 2h, with peak pleural fluid levels (C(maxpf) of 0.48 microg/ml) occurring 24h post administration and decreasing thereafter. Azithromycin peak serum concentration (C(maxserum) of 0.24 microg/ml) was observed 2h after administration and, thereafter, serum antibiotic levels remained lower than the corresponding pleural fluid ones. The area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) and terminal half-life (T(1/2)) of azithromycin was three- to six fold and twofold higher, respectively, in the pleural fluid compared to the blood serum compartment. After intravenous administration, azithromycin penetrated well into the empyemic pleural fluid, exhibiting pleural fluid levels that are inhibitory for most erythromycin-sensitive pathogens causing empyema.

Authors+Show Affiliations

General Hospital Papanikolaou, Thessaloniki, Alexandroupolis, Greece.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19854169

Citation

Saroglou, Maria, et al. "Penetration of Azithromycin in Experimental Pleural Empyema Fluid." European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 626, no. 2-3, 2010, pp. 271-5.
Saroglou M, Ismailos G, Tryfon S, et al. Penetration of azithromycin in experimental pleural empyema fluid. Eur J Pharmacol. 2010;626(2-3):271-5.
Saroglou, M., Ismailos, G., Tryfon, S., Liapakis, I., Papalois, A., & Bouros, D. (2010). Penetration of azithromycin in experimental pleural empyema fluid. European Journal of Pharmacology, 626(2-3), pp. 271-5. doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2009.10.027.
Saroglou M, et al. Penetration of Azithromycin in Experimental Pleural Empyema Fluid. Eur J Pharmacol. 2010 Jan 25;626(2-3):271-5. PubMed PMID: 19854169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Penetration of azithromycin in experimental pleural empyema fluid. AU - Saroglou,Maria, AU - Ismailos,George, AU - Tryfon,Stavros, AU - Liapakis,Ioannis, AU - Papalois,Apostolos, AU - Bouros,Demosthenes, Y1 - 2009/10/23/ PY - 2009/04/08/received PY - 2009/09/22/revised PY - 2009/10/12/accepted PY - 2009/10/27/entrez PY - 2009/10/27/pubmed PY - 2010/2/18/medline SP - 271 EP - 5 JF - European journal of pharmacology JO - Eur. J. Pharmacol. VL - 626 IS - 2-3 N2 - There were no data about the extent of azithromycin penetration into the empyemic pleural fluid in humans and in experimental animals. An empyema was created via the intrapleural injection of an Escherichia coli solution into the pleural space of New Zealand white rabbits. After an empyema was verified by thoracocentesis, 24h post inoculation, azithromycin (15 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. Antibiotic levels were determined in samples of pleural fluid and blood serum, collected serially at 2, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h, after administration. Azithromycin levels were estimated using an HPLC analytical method with fluorimetric detection. Azithromycin penetrated well into the empyemic pleural fluid, exhibiting a slower onset and decline compared to the corresponding blood serum levels. Equilibration between pleural fluid and blood serum compartments seemed to occur at 2h, with peak pleural fluid levels (C(maxpf) of 0.48 microg/ml) occurring 24h post administration and decreasing thereafter. Azithromycin peak serum concentration (C(maxserum) of 0.24 microg/ml) was observed 2h after administration and, thereafter, serum antibiotic levels remained lower than the corresponding pleural fluid ones. The area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) and terminal half-life (T(1/2)) of azithromycin was three- to six fold and twofold higher, respectively, in the pleural fluid compared to the blood serum compartment. After intravenous administration, azithromycin penetrated well into the empyemic pleural fluid, exhibiting pleural fluid levels that are inhibitory for most erythromycin-sensitive pathogens causing empyema. SN - 1879-0712 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19854169/Penetration_of_azithromycin_in_experimental_pleural_empyema_fluid_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0014-2999(09)00918-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -