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Early sexual experiences and risk factors for bacterial vaginosis.
J Infect Dis. 2009 Dec 01; 200(11):1662-70.JI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We have undertaken a cross-sectional study that investigates the association between bacterial vaginosis (BV) and sexual practices in sexually experienced and inexperienced women.

METHODS

Participants were 17-21-year-old females who attend Melbourne University, Australia. Study kits that contained an information and consent form, questionnaire, swab, and slide were distributed. Information regarding demographic characteristics and a broad range of sexual practices were collected. Gram-stained, self-collected vaginal smears were scored with the Nugent method. Associations between BV and behaviors were examined by univariate and multivariate analysis.

RESULTS

BV was diagnosed in 25 (4.7%) of 528 women (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1%-6.9%). Importantly, BV was not detected in women (n = 83) without a history of coital or noncoital sexual contact (0%; 95% CI, 0%-4.3%). BV was detected in 3 (3.8%) of 78 women (95% CI, 0.8%-10.8%) with noncoital sexual experience only and in 22 (6.0%) of 367 women (95% CI, 3.8%-8.9%) who reported penile-vaginal sex. BV was associated with a history of any genital contact with a sexual partner (P=.02). BV was strongly associated with >3 penile-vaginal sex partners in the prior year (adjusted odds ratio, 7.1; 95% CI, 2.7-18.4) by multivariable analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

This study shows a strong association between BV and penile-vaginal sex with multiple partners but found no BV in sexually inexperienced women, once a history of noncoital sexual practices was elicited. Our findings indicate that BV is not present in truly sexually inexperienced women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, The Alfred Hospital, Victoria, Australia. kfethers@mshc.org.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19863439

Citation

Fethers, Katherine A., et al. "Early Sexual Experiences and Risk Factors for Bacterial Vaginosis." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 200, no. 11, 2009, pp. 1662-70.
Fethers KA, Fairley CK, Morton A, et al. Early sexual experiences and risk factors for bacterial vaginosis. J Infect Dis. 2009;200(11):1662-70.
Fethers, K. A., Fairley, C. K., Morton, A., Hocking, J. S., Hopkins, C., Kennedy, L. J., Fehler, G., & Bradshaw, C. S. (2009). Early sexual experiences and risk factors for bacterial vaginosis. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 200(11), 1662-70. https://doi.org/10.1086/648092
Fethers KA, et al. Early Sexual Experiences and Risk Factors for Bacterial Vaginosis. J Infect Dis. 2009 Dec 1;200(11):1662-70. PubMed PMID: 19863439.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early sexual experiences and risk factors for bacterial vaginosis. AU - Fethers,Katherine A, AU - Fairley,Christopher K, AU - Morton,Anna, AU - Hocking,Jane S, AU - Hopkins,Carol, AU - Kennedy,Lisa J, AU - Fehler,Glenda, AU - Bradshaw,Catriona S, PY - 2009/10/30/entrez PY - 2009/10/30/pubmed PY - 2009/12/16/medline SP - 1662 EP - 70 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J Infect Dis VL - 200 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: We have undertaken a cross-sectional study that investigates the association between bacterial vaginosis (BV) and sexual practices in sexually experienced and inexperienced women. METHODS: Participants were 17-21-year-old females who attend Melbourne University, Australia. Study kits that contained an information and consent form, questionnaire, swab, and slide were distributed. Information regarding demographic characteristics and a broad range of sexual practices were collected. Gram-stained, self-collected vaginal smears were scored with the Nugent method. Associations between BV and behaviors were examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: BV was diagnosed in 25 (4.7%) of 528 women (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1%-6.9%). Importantly, BV was not detected in women (n = 83) without a history of coital or noncoital sexual contact (0%; 95% CI, 0%-4.3%). BV was detected in 3 (3.8%) of 78 women (95% CI, 0.8%-10.8%) with noncoital sexual experience only and in 22 (6.0%) of 367 women (95% CI, 3.8%-8.9%) who reported penile-vaginal sex. BV was associated with a history of any genital contact with a sexual partner (P=.02). BV was strongly associated with >3 penile-vaginal sex partners in the prior year (adjusted odds ratio, 7.1; 95% CI, 2.7-18.4) by multivariable analysis. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a strong association between BV and penile-vaginal sex with multiple partners but found no BV in sexually inexperienced women, once a history of noncoital sexual practices was elicited. Our findings indicate that BV is not present in truly sexually inexperienced women. SN - 1537-6613 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19863439/Early_sexual_experiences_and_risk_factors_for_bacterial_vaginosis_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/648092 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -