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Dietary arachidonic acid to EPA and DHA balance is increased among Canadian pregnant women with low fish intake.
J Nutr. 2009 Dec; 139(12):2344-50.JN

Abstract

Arachidonic [ARA, 20:4(n-6)], eicosapentaenoic [EPA, 20:5(n-3)], and docosahexaenoic acids [DHA, 22:6(n-3)] occur in the diet in animal tissue lipids, play important roles in human development and health, but have interactive and opposing functions. Meat and poultry have higher ARA and fish are richer in EPA and DHA. National databases were recently revised to include complete data on ARA in foods. We used a validated FFQ and the revised nutrient databases to quantify the distribution of ARA, EPA, and DHA intakes and balance for 204 healthy Canadian pregnant women. We focused on intake distributions because risk of adverse health effects increases at lower nutrient intakes. RBC fatty acids were analyzed concurrenly with dietary assessment. The distribution of ARA, EPA, and DHA intakes were skewed (P < 0.001), with a median (5-95th percentile) of 107 (41-225), 65 (10-228), and 105 (10-430) mg/d ARA, EPA, and DHA, respectively. Fish provided 66 and 76% of EPA and DHA, respectively, whereas eggs, poultry, and meats provided 81% of ARA. Women consuming <101 g fish/wk consumed less EPA and DHA and had markedly elevated median dietary ARA:EPA and ARA:DHA ratios and RBC lipid ARA:EPA + DHA ratios compared with women consuming >or=101 g fish/wk (P < 0.001). Relatively small increases in fish intake of 1-2 servings (25-50 g)/wk corrected the distorted dietary (n-6):(n-3) fatty acid balance among women consuming meats, but not fish. Median fish and DHA intakes below the recommended 1-2 servings/wk fish for pregnant women suggest major changes in the availability, cost, or acceptance of fish are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Child and Family Research Institute, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

19864401

Citation

Friesen, Russell W., and Sheila M. Innis. "Dietary Arachidonic Acid to EPA and DHA Balance Is Increased Among Canadian Pregnant Women With Low Fish Intake." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 139, no. 12, 2009, pp. 2344-50.
Friesen RW, Innis SM. Dietary arachidonic acid to EPA and DHA balance is increased among Canadian pregnant women with low fish intake. J Nutr. 2009;139(12):2344-50.
Friesen, R. W., & Innis, S. M. (2009). Dietary arachidonic acid to EPA and DHA balance is increased among Canadian pregnant women with low fish intake. The Journal of Nutrition, 139(12), 2344-50. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.109.112565
Friesen RW, Innis SM. Dietary Arachidonic Acid to EPA and DHA Balance Is Increased Among Canadian Pregnant Women With Low Fish Intake. J Nutr. 2009;139(12):2344-50. PubMed PMID: 19864401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary arachidonic acid to EPA and DHA balance is increased among Canadian pregnant women with low fish intake. AU - Friesen,Russell W, AU - Innis,Sheila M, Y1 - 2009/10/28/ PY - 2009/10/30/entrez PY - 2009/10/30/pubmed PY - 2010/1/7/medline SP - 2344 EP - 50 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 139 IS - 12 N2 - Arachidonic [ARA, 20:4(n-6)], eicosapentaenoic [EPA, 20:5(n-3)], and docosahexaenoic acids [DHA, 22:6(n-3)] occur in the diet in animal tissue lipids, play important roles in human development and health, but have interactive and opposing functions. Meat and poultry have higher ARA and fish are richer in EPA and DHA. National databases were recently revised to include complete data on ARA in foods. We used a validated FFQ and the revised nutrient databases to quantify the distribution of ARA, EPA, and DHA intakes and balance for 204 healthy Canadian pregnant women. We focused on intake distributions because risk of adverse health effects increases at lower nutrient intakes. RBC fatty acids were analyzed concurrenly with dietary assessment. The distribution of ARA, EPA, and DHA intakes were skewed (P < 0.001), with a median (5-95th percentile) of 107 (41-225), 65 (10-228), and 105 (10-430) mg/d ARA, EPA, and DHA, respectively. Fish provided 66 and 76% of EPA and DHA, respectively, whereas eggs, poultry, and meats provided 81% of ARA. Women consuming <101 g fish/wk consumed less EPA and DHA and had markedly elevated median dietary ARA:EPA and ARA:DHA ratios and RBC lipid ARA:EPA + DHA ratios compared with women consuming >or=101 g fish/wk (P < 0.001). Relatively small increases in fish intake of 1-2 servings (25-50 g)/wk corrected the distorted dietary (n-6):(n-3) fatty acid balance among women consuming meats, but not fish. Median fish and DHA intakes below the recommended 1-2 servings/wk fish for pregnant women suggest major changes in the availability, cost, or acceptance of fish are needed. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/19864401/Dietary_arachidonic_acid_to_EPA_and_DHA_balance_is_increased_among_Canadian_pregnant_women_with_low_fish_intake_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.109.112565 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -